Iranian resistance: Terrorist designation of IRGC ‘long overdue’

Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei with commanders of the notorious Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. (Screen grab from an NCRI video)
Updated 09 April 2019

Iranian resistance: Terrorist designation of IRGC ‘long overdue’

  • US President Donald Trump on Monday designated the IRGC as a "terrorist organization"
  • Iranian resistance urges the European Union to also take action against the IRGC

JEDDAH: Washington's blacklisting of Iran's notorious Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) is "an urgent and necessary step to end war and terrorism throughout the region and the world," the Iranian resistance said on Monday.

"This action, which was long overdue, should now be completed by designating the Iranian regime’s Ministry of Intelligence and Security (MOIS),” the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) said in a statement.

In a first, US President Donald Trump on Monday designated the IRGC as a "terrorist organization", saying the  move “recognizes the reality that Iran is not only a State Sponsor of Terrorism, but that the IRGC actively participates in, finances, and promotes terrorism as a tool of statecraft.”

“The IRGC is the Iranian government’s primary means of directing and implementing its global terrorist campaign,” Trump had said.




Fighters of Iran's notorious Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps with the "terrorist" label are shown in a video posted on the website of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI).

NRCI president-elect Maryam Rajavi described the US action as a "long-standing and righteous demand" of the Iranian Resistance and "an imperative for Middle East security, peace, and stability."

The IRGC "constitutes the pillar of the velayat-e faqih regime (absolute clerical rule), is the main apparatus of repression, the primary driver of war and export of terrorism, and responsible for pursuing nuclear weapons and missile projects," Rajavi said. 

She said the terrorist organization "controls the lion’s share of the Iran's economy".




National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) president-elect Maryam Rajavi. (Courtesy of NCRI site)

"It is no wonder that the religious fascism ruling Iran, its apologists and mercenaries have become terrified of IRGC’s designation," she said.

The NCRI said it is time for the European Union to follow suit by designating the IRGC also as a terrorist entity, pointing out that the Iranian regime has caused so much bloodshed in other countries such as Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Yemen and Afghanistan.

Such designation would help the Iranian people and the Resistance achieve "the ultimate solution to rid the world of the ruling theocracy in Iran", the movement said.
 

 


Protesters regain control of third bridge in Baghdad

Updated 17 November 2019

Protesters regain control of third bridge in Baghdad

  • Security forces used tear gas and stun bombs to prevent protesters from getting right across Ahrar Bridge in central Baghdad
  • More than 300 people have been killed since the start of mass unrest in Baghdad

BAGHDAD: Iraqi protesters regained control of a third bridge leading to Baghdad’s Green Zone on Sunday, taking further ground in the biggest wave of anti-government demonstrations in decades.
Security forces used tear gas and stun bombs to prevent protesters from getting right across Ahrar Bridge in central Baghdad, part of a weeks-long attempt to disrupt traffic and reach the Green Zone housing government ministry and embassies.
Protesters made a barricade of old cabinets, trash cans and metal sheeting on the bridge while security forces took positions behind blast walls installed to prevent protesters from crossing to the other side. Protesters who choked on the tear gas were evacuated by tuk-tuk, a Reuters cameraman said.
On Saturday, Iraqi demonstrators reoccupied part of adjacent Sinak Bridge and a nearby tall building in Baghdad that security forces had pushed them away from a week before. They have held a third bridge, Jamhuriya, since October 25.
More than 300 people have been killed since the start of mass unrest in Baghdad and southern Iraq in early October, the largest demonstrations since the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003.
Protesters are demanding the overthrow of a political class seen as corrupt and beholden to foreign interests.
In Basra in the south, dozens of protesters burned tires and briefly blocked some roads on Sunday, before police managed to restore control and reopen them, police said.
The unrest has shattered the relative calm that followed the defeat of Islamic State in 2017.