Russian ‘calligrafitti’ artist seeks to merge the world’s languages

Updated 23 April 2019

Russian ‘calligrafitti’ artist seeks to merge the world’s languages

DUBAI: Dubai’s Opera Gallery just unveiled its latest exhibition — a rare look at the work of up-and-coming Russian artist Pokras Lampas, who creates calligraphy with non-Arabic scripts.

Set to run until May 4 in the gallery’s Dubai International Financial Center location, the exhibit showcases the artist’s unique canvas work.

The artist, who marries calligraphy with street art techniques, spoke to Arab News about the moment he discovered the art of calligraphy, after working as a graffiti artist in Moscow.




(Image supplied)

“I used to do a lot of work on the street with graffiti artists and one day I found that there was a new (style) of art called ‘calligrafitti.’ I was like ‘wow,’ I had never seen it before,” he said.

Lampas started researching the art form and visited museums around the world in a bid to understand more. He was particularly inspired by the likes of Niels “Shoe” Meulman, an Amsterdam-based artist whose style draws on Japanese, European and Arabic calligraphy, and Tunisia’s El Seed.

He told Arab News that the artists furthered his interest in the art form — “how it can be created… and how, at the same time, to respect the history of calligraphy.”

The artist started out as a street artist and gained fame by winning local graffiti competitions, as well as “tagging” his name on walls around Moscow.




(Image supplied) 

“I used to be a graffiti artist and work for 5-6 hours, or a few days in a row,” he said, adding that he now typically takes 30-40 hours to complete one piece of art.

“The base of my work is to research how I can deconstruct the shape of the existing language and recreate it with influence from other countries and other cultural backgrounds,” he added, explaining how his use of the Latin alphabet separates his work from traditional Arabic calligraphy.

The 27-year-old artist expanded on his use of international scripts, saying he sees a future in which international alphabets can “be merged by different countries to be more multi-cultural, different and unique.”




(Image supplied) 

His travels have taken him across the world in a bid to learn more about his chosen art form — and he is keen to make is mark by molding the future of calligraphy.

“I’m not going to travel (just) to get inspiration. I’m trying to explore the world of calligraphy and communication of different cultures and merge it together to see how calligraphy can be changed in the future.”


UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, Kathryn Jones learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region. (Shutterstock)
Updated 25 May 2020

UAE brand’s fresh approach to skincare looking good for future

DUBAI: Skincare products can quite often sit on shelfs or in delivery vehicles for weeks and months, stored in unsuitable conditions.

And despite brands promoting them as organic and natural, some customers might question the effectiveness of products left lying around for long periods after being produced.

However, Kathryn Jones, founder of the UAE-based brand Kathryn Jones Hand Blended Serums, or KJ Serums for short, told Arab News how her company created fresh products every month for customers.

Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.” (Supplied)

“The concept of a freshly-made skincare serum is something quite different and our customers have really embraced it. They appreciate it’s a fresh product that must be used up within a month when it’s at its most active and effective and repurchased – almost like a food stuff,” she said.

Jones, who is originally from Wales, in the UK, launched KJ Serums in 2017 and started her brand “out of necessity.”

She added: “I simply could not afford the prices of some of the top skincare brands but still wanted excellent results.”

With her background in the biopharmaceuticals industry, she started experimenting and developing her own formulas. “The core proposition is ‘hand blended’ because that’s how it all started, by hand blending and perfecting the serum formulas myself here in the UAE,” she said.

Having lived in Dubai for more than seven years, the entrepreneur learned a lot about the Middle Eastern market and the needs of people who live within the region.

“Our climate here is extreme often for eight months or more of the year, especially in the Gulf region. A lot our customers will ask for a product that reduces oiliness and sheen on the skin and are reluctant to purchase products that contain a lot of oils, or are very heavily moisturizing,” Jones added.

The businesswoman believes the Middle East market is “wonderfully diverse” with different attitudes and expectations toward skincare products.

“Of course, this is a challenge to develop effective products which can address many different skin types and issues, but the market is truly receptive to new concepts,” she said.

Jones pointed out that with the current lockdown situation due to the ongoing spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), people had more time to care for their skin.

“The coronavirus pandemic has obviously confined us to our homes, and, given the steady increase in the number of enquiries we are receiving, it suggests consumers currently have more time to consider their online skincare purchases and perhaps have more time to invest in an effective routine,” she said.

On whether the COVID-19 outbreak would change the future of the skincare industry, Jones added: “I think that many consumers, either through necessity or out of a desire to support local brands might have chosen to source their products from different manufacturers and therefore brand loyalties may have been affected to a certain extent.”