Saudis volunteer to aid Makkah pilgrims during Ramadan

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Around 1,400 doctors and medical students were volunteering, hoping to make a difference and to serve their country. (SPA)
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Updated 21 May 2019

Saudis volunteer to aid Makkah pilgrims during Ramadan

  • 1,400 doctors and medical students are volunteering

MAKKAH: Saudis are volunteering in Makkah to help pilgrims, dealing with their health issues and any other requirements they may have so their Umrah can be performed with ease.
Doctors, teachers, engineers and government employees are among those giving their time and energy during the holy month of Ramadan to help the millions of Muslims who are in Makkah.
The head of Nabad, a volunteer group, said that medical professionals and other specialists were focusing on nationals and residents through events in malls, hospitals and health centers.  
“Nabad has contributed to promoting knowledge among members of civil society and focused on serving widows, divorcees, low-income people, people with special needs and the elderly through events carried out in conjunction with government bodies,” Dr. Yasser Al-Sharif told Arab News.

HIGHLIGHtS

1,400 doctors and medical students are volunteering.

Volunteer groups are promoting knowledge among members of civil society.

Many volunteer activities are focused on serving widows, divorcees and low-income people.

He added that 1,400 doctors and medical students were volunteering, hoping to make a difference and to serve their country.
 Al-Sharif said the events were aimed at raising awareness about several programs, including one about health empowerment ambassadors, for guests of the Grand Mosque. Pilgrims are provided with information upon arrival at the airport in different languages, he said.
Rania Shodari is part of a volunteer program for pilgrims, offering them gifts and introducing them to Makkah landmarks, and described the experience as special.
 “Volunteering should come from the heart and not be a means to show off,” she told Arab News. “We focus on bringing smiles to pilgrims’ faces and intensifying efforts to reflect real Saudi hospitality, from the moment they arrive until their departure.


Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Photo/Shutterstock
Updated 19 October 2020

Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

  • According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage

JEDDAH: Splashes of pink are appearing in Saudi Arabia’s public spaces to raise awareness about the importance of breast cancer screening.
A number of campaigns are underway this month to support this outreach — in malls, on the street and on billboards.
Pamphlets are being handed out, videos and interactive pictures are on display, there are fundraising activities such as hiking and biking, and medical students have been talking to shoppers and passers-by as part of efforts to increase people’s knowledge.
In Jeddah there was a Tai Chi class on the city’s waterfront, headed by Amatallah Bahaziq, that was attended by female members of Bliss Runners and Bolts. Another event was a bike ride organized by Jeddah Cyclists that included men and women.
A number of major cities across the Kingdom have also seen pop-up campaigns, with specialists ready to answer questions and play a proactive role in spreading proper knowledge and information about the disease, its detection and the chances of survival when detected early.

HIGHLIGHT

According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.

The Zahra Breast Cancer Association is one of Saudi Arabia’s leading organizations dedicated to raising awareness about the disease. It has been supporting cancer patients and survivors and normalizing conversations about breast cancer among the community, with a renewed emphasis during October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
“Given the circumstances (due to the pandemic) we focused our efforts to raise awareness to the importance of early detection virtually,” a representative from the association told Arab News. “With billboards and visuals spread across Saudi cities, we’re still following through with our campaign promise to raise awareness each year and send the message across: Early detection will save your life.”
According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.