Cannes Diary: The world’s glitziest film festival through the eyes of an industry insider

The Cannes festival wraps up on May 25. (AFP/File)
Updated 25 May 2019
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Cannes Diary: The world’s glitziest film festival through the eyes of an industry insider

  • The director says Cannes is more than just a movie festival
  • Attendees wear color-coded badges, which specify their title and occupation

Film director Hadi Ghandour takes us behind the scenes at the Cannes Film Festival with his revealing diary entries.

Day 1

I am on a train from Paris to Cannes. A middle-aged woman maneuvers her way around my legs and sits beside me. She is on her phone, making sure to loudly telegraph to the entire train that she is attending the festival. “I hope Xavier Dolan doesn’t disappoint me like last time! And can you believe that Alain Delon is being honored? What a travesty!” We are all supposed to be impressed. My festival experience begins before I get there and I am forced to endure her pontification for the next five hours.

The train arrives on an overcast afternoon. The first thing I do is pick up my badge. Without it you are considered a third-class citizen. I inch past the security blocks that barricade the Croisette like a fortress and make my way to the Grand Palais.

What makes this place so distinctive and often daunting is the sheer amount of stuff going on. It is not only a film festival, but a massive market, an annual industry meet-up, a sprawling seminar, a paparazzi hunting ground, an awards ceremony, and an everlasting party.

Cafes, restaurants and hotel lobbies turn into networking hubs and industry meeting grounds. TV screens that usually broadcast football matches or music videos air live feeds of press conferences and red carpets. Beachfront apartments are transformed into movie company offices, with their logos hanging from the balconies and the harbor morphs into international pavilions for global cinema.

I often find that the most interesting films play at the Director’s Fortnight. It is late in the evening. My friend has snatched up a couple of priority invitations to Robert Eggers’ latest picture “The Lighthouse.”

Envious eyes watch us zip through the interminable line that wraps around the JW Marriott.

I sink into my chair but, within moments, a sense of dread washes over me when I hear the shrill voice from earlier today. It’s the woman from the train. The festival may be larger than life, but it is still a very small place.

“The Lighthouse” is hypnotic, terrifying and has remarkable performances from Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe. It is guaranteed to give me nightmares later.




Willem Dafoe stars in The Lighthouse. (AFP)

Day 2

I am having a breakfast meeting by the shore. A seagull swoops in and boldly pilfers a piece of bread from the basket. Even the seagulls here are fierce and determined.

 A 50-something gentleman interrupts our conversation and humbly introduces himself as a filmmaker from Saskatchewan who has been in the business for years.

He slides over a heap of DVDs - films he has written, directed, produced, edited, shot, acted in and composed. He points at one of them, which is enveloped in a half-ripped cover. “This one here is my masterpiece,” he tells me.

Everyone has something to pitch. The whole town is like a never-ending speed date. Shifty eyes dart around mid-conversation. First, they land on your color-coded badge to decipher your title and worth, then swiftly onto the next person.

Ideas float around with the heft of low-hanging clouds over people’s heads. You can almost see them. The movies in competition may be front and center, but the energy is already directed at the future.

I swing by the Marche Du Film, the festival’s film market. Located in the Palais basement, it is a maze of industry booths where deals are negotiated and struck. It is not only the least glamorous part of the festival, but the least glamorous place you could ever visit.

The market begins to suffocate me so I decide to watch a movie, “Lilian” by Andreas Horvath. Waiting in line at this festival is a rite. You must always add an hour and a half to a movie’s running time to gauge your overall time investment.

The sun is setting and the sea is iridescent. A nighttime chill begins to emerge. One of my favorite things to do at the festival is to watch a film on the beach. There is something wonderfully primal and peaceful about it. A bunch of strangers gathered on a sandy shore beneath the moonlight, watching and listening to a story unfold.  A documentary is playing, “Haut Les Filles” by Francois Armanet. Everyone has sunk into their chairs and are wrapped up in blankets to protect them from the gusts of wind. They look so peaceful and vulnerable, a poignant end to the vicissitudes of their day.




A woman checks her phone in the Marche Du Film. (AFP)

Day 3

It is 7:30 a.m. and I make my way to a film screening — “Frankie” by Ira Sachs. On my way there I spot a group of people, one of them is in a wrinkled tuxedo that has lost its respectability. Last night hasn't yet ended for them. 

The film dips me in and out of a light and pleasant sleep, but I somehow suspect this could be its intended effect.

I walk out of the Grand Theatre Lumiere. The glare assaults my eyes and brings me back to the real world, which suddenly looks more mundane.

I begin to exit the Grand Palais when I am approached by a festival attendant. She randomly offers me a seat at the press conference for “Young Ahmed,” the latest movie by the Dardennes brothers. Perhaps she liked my countenance, but most likely she needed to fill a few empty seats. 

Things are in overdrive today. It’s the Tarantino film premier and everyone seems to be seeking access to the screening. I overhear a woman pleading for that golden ticket. “My son is diabetic!” she says. What in the world does that have to do with getting a movie ticket?

After lunch, I glance at my watch and realize I’m about to miss my train. I run to the station and just barely make it. 

Three days in Cannes feel like a week. It is a cycle that ebbs and flows between the mad rush of the movie business and the peace and refuge of movie watching. It can be overwhelming and exhausting. But it’s all about the movies, so who can really complain?




Quentin Tarantino premiered ‘Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood’ in Cannes. (AFP)

 


The one where ‘Friends’ turns 25: Why the Arab world still can’t get enough

Twenty-five years ago tomorrow, viewers got their first glimpse of a show that would go on to dominate viewing figures, watercooler chat, and tabloids for the next decade: “Friends.”(YouTube)
Updated 33 min 4 sec ago

The one where ‘Friends’ turns 25: Why the Arab world still can’t get enough

  • The show’s 238 episodes made superstars of its six relatively unknown leads and earned 63 Emmy nominations
  • Arab News spoke to several regional fans from different generations who praised the show’s universality

DUBAI: Twenty-five years ago tomorrow, viewers got their first glimpse of a show that would go on to dominate viewing figures, watercooler chat, and tabloids for the next decade: “Friends.”

It’s doubtful that even the most optimistic of TV executives would have dreamed of the stratospheric success that the sitcom — which followed the life of six 20-something friends (three men, three women — all white, all good-looking) living in New York — would go on to enjoy.

 

 

 

The writers’ great trick was to make the six characters broad and accessible, but (just) variable enough to have some depth and become more than two-dimensional stereotypes. So, everyone recognized themselves or a friend in dim, kind-hearted womanizer and struggling actor Joey; or in uptight, anxious Ross; or bossy-but-well-meaning Monica; ditzy, privileged Rachel; sarcastic, insecure Chandler; or in kooky, but often insightful, free spirit Phoebe.

As Yoman Taha, a UAE-based fan, told Arab News: “I think many Arabs watch it because the diversity of its characters allows everyone to relate to it in one way or another.”

In series 4, episode 15 Chandler takes an unplanned trip to Yemen. Scroll down to watch the hilarious clip. (YouTube)

The show’s 238 episodes made superstars of its six relatively unknown leads, earned 63 Emmy nominations (and six wins), spawned “The Rachel” (reportedly the most-requested hairstyle of all time), and were seen all around the world countless times on syndication (which the six savvy stars still earn a percentage of, netting around $20 million a year each, according to USA Today). Its popularity was — and remains — staggering. Thanks to its ubiquity on international networks, “Friends” is probably into its third generation of fans.

And the Middle East is far from immune to its charms. Arab News spoke to several regional fans from different generations who praised the show’s universality. Twenty two- year-old Alia Nabulsi said, “I can be anywhere in the world and watching ‘Friends’ makes me feel like (I’m) home.”

“It’s a classic show and I watch it to remind myself what a perfect and healthy friendship is supposed to be like,” said Ameen Kunbargi, 24.

In one of the show’s few references to Arab food and culture, Ross threatens Rachel’s sister Amy with a falafel ban. Scroll down to watch the comical clip. (YouTube)

For 42-year-old Souhail Halwani, “Friends” has been a constant companion for more than half his life.

“I used to wait for each DVD to come out and I would buy it (straight away),” he said. “I still watch it. When I have time, I’ll play it on Netflix.

“Me and people from my generation, we used to watch a lot of other sitcoms that lasted for a while, but I no longer watch any of the others. With ‘Friends,’ you can relate to the cast — you can relate to the day-to-day things that happen to them: The fun side of it, the sarcasm and the funny way they (made light of) a bad situation,” he continued. “Even knowing what happens — I know almost all the scenes — I still laugh. Like, I know Ross’s reactions, but I’ll be waiting for it and I will laugh every time.”

Not everyone agrees, of course. Talla Al-Khafaji, 31, feels the show has dated badly: “For starters, they always use the fact that Monica used to be overweight as a punch line — as if being overweight is comical. Also, there are no people of color on the show, despite the fact that it’s New York, (which is) full of diverse ethnicities. Additionally, there have been various occasions where Ross and Chandler, who are super-misogynistic, have made jokes about being attracted to teenagers, and that’s problematic.”

Certainly, it’s reasonable to say that — by today’s social standards — “Friends” has issues. But it’s also reasonable to question if a sitcom from an era when “The Benny Hill Show” was still considered by many to be wholesome family fun should really be held to those standards. The majority of its fans would likely say not. Yes, there was little-to-no representation of ethnic diversity (Arabs barely got a look in, except for a falafel salesman whom Rachel’s sister mistakes for Ross, and a crowd of Yemenis at the airport in the episode where Chandler claims he’s been reassigned to “15 Yemen Road, Yemen” in an effort to break up with his girlfriend, Janice), but the immaculate writing and performances, it seems, are enough to make up for that. For 21-year-old Sarah Kader, “the more I watch it, the funnier it gets. I never get bored of it.”

And for industry insiders, including Mazen Hayek, group director of commercial, PR and CSR at MBC (which screened “Friends” in the region for many years with Arabic subtitles, although it was never dubbed), the show remains a shining example of television’s potential for mass appeal.

“The series embodies the best of the comedy genre,” Hayek said. “It’s light and funny, entertaining, insightful, tackles real societal issues, appeals to all family members and is — mostly — fit to be viewed any time, anywhere, by a global audience.”

John Korounis, a spokesman for the official Warner Bros. Studio tour in Hollywood, agreed. “It’s all about the friends. It’s not about current events, so none of the show really hinges on what’s happening in the world,” he said. “It’s about their dynamic. It’s about their bubble. So it’s almost timeless, because the jokes are about them and the situations that they’re in.”

FASTFACT

Get your ‘Friends’ fix

As you’d expect with all the hype around the 25th anniversary of one of the biggest shows in the history of television, there are plenty of short- and long term tie-ins being announced around the world. Dubai Mall is one of several places currently hosting the famous couch from the show’s integral Central Perk coffee shop as part of the birthday celebrations. And LEGO has announced a “faithful recreation” of Central Perk “packed with authentic details” (and seven minifigures of the lead characters and grumpy barista Gunther), plus the stage where Phoebe — a, let’s say, ‘singular’ guitarist and singer — would often perform her acoustic sets. For those who want a taste of Central Perk, but can’t be bothered assembling LEGO bricks, there’s a “’Friends’- inspired” (the “inspired” is important… lawyers) café near Dubai Museum, where — manager Habib Khan told Arab News — there are plans to “reinstate a solo singer, in line with Phoebe.” The café serves “grab-and-go meals” with an Emirati-twist, as well as coffee, in a space where, Khan said, “we wanted to capture the spirit (of the show).”

Hayek praised the show’s leading actors, but added, “The scriptwriters made the difference in making ‘Friends’ such an all-time classic.” Of the show’s ageless appeal in the Middle East, he said: “Human insights have no boundaries. People — especially youth — relate to the same kind of issues, aspirations, and jokes.”

Rumors of a reunion show, or movie, continue to resurface every couple of years — despite constant rebuttals from cast and network. And that’s something fans from the Middle Eastern — and beyond — would definitely turn out for in droves.

“I would love to see the same cast in new episodes,” said Halwani. “To see how they relate to the current day, because technology has changed and a lot has happened since they stopped.”

However, he added. “They keep talking about a reunion but I don’t see it happening. But I hope it does. Even a movie! Anything!”

FACTOID

Get your ‘Friends’ fix

As you’d expect with all the hype around the 25th anniversary of one of the biggest shows in the history of television, there are plenty of short- and long term tie-ins being announced around the world. Dubai Mall is one of several places currently hosting the famous couch from the show’s integral Central Perk coffee shop as part of the birthday celebrations. And LEGO has announced a “faithful recreation” of Central Perk “packed with authentic details” (and seven minifigures of the lead characters and grumpy barista Gunther), plus the stage where Phoebe — a, let’s say, ‘singular’ guitarist and singer — would often perform her acoustic sets. For those who want a taste of Central Perk, but can’t be bothered assembling LEGO bricks, there’s a “’Friends’- inspired” (the “inspired” is important… lawyers) café near Dubai Museum, where — manager Habib Khan told Arab News — there are plans to “reinstate a solo singer, in line with Phoebe.” The café serves “grab-and-go meals” with an Emirati-twist, as well as coffee, in a space where, Khan said, “we wanted to capture the spirit (of the show).”