King Salman tells moderate Islam conference that Saudi Arabia has fought ‘extremism, violence and terrorism’

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The king said the world today is in serious need of a role model, and Muslims could answer that call. (SPA)
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The king said the world today is in serious need of a role model, and Muslims could answer that call. (SPA)
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The king said the world today is in serious need of a role model, and Muslims could answer that call. (SPA)
Updated 28 May 2019

King Salman tells moderate Islam conference that Saudi Arabia has fought ‘extremism, violence and terrorism’

  • At a Muslim World League conference in Makkah, king calls for an end to racist and xenophobic speech
  • Saudi Arabia is committed to 'spreading peace and co-existence'

MAKKAH: Saudi Arabia has fought against extremism with “determination and decisiveness,” King Salman told a Muslim World League (MWL) conference on Monday. 

In an address to the MWL’s conference in Makkah on moderate Islam, the king called for an end to racist and xenophobic speech.

“The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has strongly condemned and fought all forms of extremism, violence and terrorism, with ideology, determination and decisiveness, and has opposed any identification with them,” the king said in a speech delivered on his behalf by Makkah Gov. Prince Khalid Al-Faisal.

Saudi Arabia is committed to “spreading peace and coexistence and has established international intellectual platforms and centers to promote these principles,” the king said.   

“We reiterate our invitation to stop the racist and xenophobic speech from whatever source and under any pretext whatsoever,” he added.

FASTFACT

 

● King calls for an end to racist and xenophobic speech.

● The conference marks the start of several major regional summits in the Kingdom this week.

● Participants will discuss religious pluralism and cultural communication, and the common values in contemporary international relations.

The king said the world today is in serious need of a role model and that Muslims can help spread the good values in the world.

The MWL, an international nongovernmental Islamic organization, based in Makkah, is holding the “Moderation and Indications” conference for four days.  The event is being attended by dignitaries, scholars, senior officials and leading thinkers from the Muslim world.

The conference marks the start of several major regional summits in the Kingdom this week. They include emergency meetings of the Gulf Cooperation Council and the Arab League convened by Saudi Arabia to discuss the heightened tensions in the region with Iran.




Participants at the start Monday of the Muslim World League Conference in Makkah. (SPA photo)

The event will discuss topics including “Moderation in Islamic History and Jurisprudence Heritage” and “Neutral Speeches and the Contemporary Age” under the theme of “Moderation Between Authenticity and Modernity.

Other topics will include “Differences and the Culture of Moderation” and “Practical Programs to Promote Moderation Among Youth.”

The fifth session of the conference will focus on “Moderation and the Message of Civilized Communication.” Participants will discuss religious pluralism and cultural communication, and the common values in contemporary international relations.

 


New projects aim to share Saudi human-rights successes with the world

Updated 16 July 2020

New projects aim to share Saudi human-rights successes with the world

  • Initiatives aim to highlight historic reforms and promote more accurate international view of Kingdom’s efforts to improve human rights
  • Human Rights Commission also aims to enhance cooperation with organizations working in the field in other countries

RIYADH: The Saudi Human Rights Commission (HRC) has launched three international initiatives to highlight the success of recent reforms implemented by the Kingdom, and enhance its cooperation with other organizations working in the field.

“(Saudi Arabia) has witnessed historic transformations and qualitative moves in human rights, as more than 70 reform decisions in the field were issued under the directives of King Salman and under the direct leadership and tireless follow-up of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman,” said Awwad Al-Awwad, the president of the HRC.

He described the reforms as a success story, and said the commission will work to highlight the achievements around the world.

At the forefront of this effort is the launch of the HRC’s International Communication Program, as part of which representatives of civil-society institutions will be invited to participate in commission meetings and international human-rights events. In addition, young national leaders will be trained to enhance the representation of the Kingdom in human-rights organizations worldwide.

The HRC considers that the program presents an important opportunity to educate and inform international partners and the public about the unprecedented steps Saudi Arabia is taking to meet international standards of human rights and its achievements to that end. It also provides a mechanism that will enable the country to develop its relationship with the international community and highlight developments and reforms.

Al-Awwad also announced the launch of the HRC International Platform, which will focus on sharing English-language information and data reflecting the progress made in safeguarding human rights in the Kingdom. This will include direct interaction with the public on social media.

The third new initiative is a monthly, English-language newsletter featuring information about the latest human-rights reforms and developments in Saudi Arabia, including efforts being made to promote and protect them. A mailing list has also been created that includes more than 500 prominent human-rights campaigners around the world. The newsletter and other HRC publications will be sent to them to enhance communication and interaction, and keep them informed of human-rights initiatives in the Kingdom.

Al-Awwad said that the new initiatives are designed to reveal the true state of human rights in the Kingdom, which has undergone unprecedented development at all levels in the past few years. They will also improve communication and encourage positive relationships with human-rights campaigners and organizations in other countries, he added, in an effort to correct misconceptions that have formed for many reasons, not least the absence until now of accurate information.

The HRC has already produced the first issue of its newsletter, which highlighted the Kingdom’s improved ranking in the latest edition of the US State Department’s annual Trafficking in Persons Report, which was published in June. It praised the efforts being made by Saudi authorities to crack down on human trafficking through a series of reforms, the most recent of which was the launch of the national referral mechanism. This was strengthened by a Saudi-international training partnership, organized through the International Organization for Migration and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, and a Saudi-US partnership to combat human trafficking.

The newsletter also reported on the Kingdom’s efforts to tackle terrorism, which undermines and threatens human rights. In addition, it included information about penal reforms, and the Supreme Court’s decision to abolish flogging as a punishment in ta’zir cases — in which, under Sharia, punishment is at the discretion of the judge or ruler — and replace it with imprisonment and/or a fine.