Broadway has record season as ticket revenues double in 10 years

Despite lacking big several shows such as “Tootsie” and “The Prom” have still done well on Broadway. (AFP)
Updated 30 May 2019

Broadway has record season as ticket revenues double in 10 years

  • Some 14.7 million people spent $1.82 billion on tickets to see 38 different shows
  • Earnings have nearly doubled in the past decade and more than tripled in the last 20 years

NEW YORK: Broadway shows in New York had a record-breaking 2018-2019 season, the theater district said Wednesday, both in attendance and revenues, which have doubled in the last 10 years.
Some 14.7 million people spent $1.82 billion on tickets to see 38 different shows, with revenue up 7.8 percent from the year before.
Earnings have nearly doubled in the past decade and more than tripled in the last 20 years.
A statement from The Broadway League notes that the comparison between 2018-2019 and 2017-2018 gets even better when correcting for the fact the 2017-2018 season was 53 weeks instead of 52 — attendance would have been up 9.5 percent and revenues up 10.3 percent.
Despite lacking hits as big as 2015-2016’s “Hamilton,” 2016-2017’s “Dear Evan Hansen” or “2017-2018’s “The Band’s Visit,” several shows, such as “Tootsie” and “The Prom” have still done well.
And the much-anticipated adaptation of Harper Lee’s iconic anti-racism novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” was the breakout of the season.
After a jump last year, overall ticket prices remained fairly stable, with an average cost of $123.87, a 0.6 percent increase.
But this stability masks a strong disparity between the price of tickets for musicals, which were down by 2.3 percent, and the price of tickets for plays, which saw a sharp rise of 30 percent.
That was partly due to the effect of tickets for “To Kill a Mockingbird,” which in some cases sold for as much as $499.


Russians rush to public bath after coronavirus lockdown without hot water

Updated 12 min 30 sec ago

Russians rush to public bath after coronavirus lockdown without hot water

  • Public baths only way for many Russians living in smaller towns to wash themselves in comfort

TUTAYEV, Russia: Russian women flocked to their small town’s “banya” or public steam sauna when it reopened after the coronavirus lockdown, for the luxury of hot water after going without for six weeks.
The public banya is the only way for many Russians living in smaller towns to wash themselves in comfort as older homes do not have central heating or hot water supplies.
In Tutayev, a town some 300 kilometers northeast of Moscow on the Volga River, only 71 percent of the 40,000 strong population have all the conveniences, official data shows.
“It’s a necessity for us as we couldn’t wash ourselves,” one of the first banya visitors, Svetlana Travnikova, said. “How is it possible (not to wash), pandemic or no pandemic?”
Another visitor at Friday’s first session, Irina Kutavtseva, said going to the banya was a festive occasion for her.
Receptionist Tamara Bryukova, donning a mask and clad in rubber gloves, said calls from those in need of a hot steam were coming non-stop. Naked bathing means separate days are set aside for women and men and next week is fully booked, she said.
People had to book in advance to limit numbers for social distancing and have their temperature taken at the entrance, administrators said, and the hall-like steam room was disinfected after each 90-minute session.
Public banyas in many other Russian regions remain closed as the decision on easing lockdown measures is taken by local authorities according to the situation on the ground.
Local officials in the Yaroslav region, where Tutayev is located, had recommended banyas work “without visitors or online” to prevent the spread of the virus, a decision which caused a public outcry at the time.
“Banyas working remotely without visitors is a joke,” Tutayev resident Vladimir Kolomenskiy said, “and when people can’t wash it’s a health risk too.”