Saudi foundation wins gold, bronze in European Physics Olympiad

Saudi foundation wins gold, bronze in European Physics Olympiad
Azan Al-Majnooni and Hisham Al-Maliki won gold and bronze medals at the European Physics Olympiad (EUPHO) 2019 in Riga, Latvia. (SPA)
Updated 06 June 2019

Saudi foundation wins gold, bronze in European Physics Olympiad

Saudi foundation wins gold, bronze in European Physics Olympiad
  • EUPHO is an international student contest, first held in 2017 in Estonia, and then in Russia 12 months later.

RIYADH: Azan Al-Majnooni and Hisham Al-Maliki, of the King Abdul Aziz and his Companions Foundation for Giftedness and Creativity (Mawhiba), won gold and bronze medals respectively at the European Physics Olympiad (EUPHO) 2019, in Riga, Latvia.
The contest ran from May 31 to June 4, and the Saudi duo were praised for their awards by the secretary-general of Mawhiba, Dr. Saud bin Saeed Al-Mathami.
Al-Mathami stressed that the accomplishments were achieved thanks to government support for the sciences and the foundation. This was the first time the Kingdom had taken part in EUPHO, which hosted 26 other nations.
“This comes as an extension to the march toward achieving the targets of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 through improving education and building a solid base for a talented generation, capable of realizing the aspirations of a state able to rely on creativity and innovation as a means to achieve,” he said.
The secretary-general added that Saudi Arabia paid great attention to gifted and talented citizens, catering their needs and requirements, upgrading services and programs supporting them, and creating the right environment to grow and develop their abilities.
Al-Mathami underlined that this victory was the result of fruitful and constructive cooperation between Mawhiba and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and the Royal Commission for Jubail and Yanbu.
EUPHO is an international student contest, first held in 2017 in Estonia, and then in Russia 12 months later.


Who’s Who: Dr. Hessah Al-Ageel, director general at the Saudi Institute of Public Administration

Who’s Who: Dr. Hessah Al-Ageel, director general at the Saudi Institute of Public Administration
Updated 1 min 38 sec ago

Who’s Who: Dr. Hessah Al-Ageel, director general at the Saudi Institute of Public Administration

Who’s Who: Dr. Hessah Al-Ageel, director general at the Saudi Institute of Public Administration

Dr. Hessah Al-Ageel has been the director general of the women’s branch of the Institute of Public Administration (IPA) in the Eastern Province since 2015.

As part of the IPA’s role in helping public servants, especially those with disabilities in workplaces, the branch recently delivered a three-day, text-processing training program designed for the region’s female public employees with hearing difficulties.

Al-Ageel received a bachelor’s degree in translation from King Saud University (KSU) in 2003. Seven years later, she obtained a master’s degree in applied linguistics (TESOL) from La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. In 2016, she was granted a doctorate in global, urban and social studies from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology.

In 2005, Al-Ageel joined the IPA, where she served as a faculty staff member in the English language department at the Riyadh women’s branch for nearly 10 years before she was appointed head of the women’s branch in the Eastern Province.

Al-Ageel’s doctoral thesis focused on the behavior of Saudi women in contemporary Arabic-speaking situations. The research she presented for the degree investigated Saudi pidgin Arabic that has emerged as a result of Saudi people interacting with foreign workers, especially Asians.

In 2018, the IPA published an Arabic version of Jason W. Osborne’s “Best Practices in Logistic Regression” translated by Al-Ageel. She has also translated and reviewed a number of scientific papers in different fields, and has led consultation teams in training needs assessment, human resource and organizational structures.

She is also active in increasing awareness about corporate social responsibility and sustainable development goals.


Saudi air defenses intercept five drones launched by Yemen’s Houthi militia toward Jazan

Saudi air defenses intercept five drones launched by Yemen’s Houthi militia toward Jazan
Updated 29 min 53 sec ago

Saudi air defenses intercept five drones launched by Yemen’s Houthi militia toward Jazan

Saudi air defenses intercept five drones launched by Yemen’s Houthi militia toward Jazan
  • Arab coalition says taking operational measures to protect civilians and deal with the imminent threat

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s air defenses on Wednesday intercepted and destroyed five explosive-laden drone launched by Yemen’s Houthis toward the Kingdom’s southern region, state TV reported.
The Arab coalition said one of the drones was targeting the province of Jazan, adding that the Iran-backed militia continues its attempts to deliberately target civilians and civilian objects in Saudi Arabia.
A few hours later, the coalition said four more drones were intercepted without specifying their intended target. 
“We are taking operational measures to protect civilians and deal with the imminent threat,” the coalition added.
On Tuesday, Saudi air defenses intercepted a booby-trapped drone launched by the Houthis toward the southern city of Khamis Mushait.
And on Saturday, the coalition said the Kingdom’s air force had intercepted and destroyed 17 explosive-laden drones launched by the Houthi militia toward Saudi Arabia’s southern region within 24 hours.
“The interception was successfully carried out in Yemeni airspace, and the hostile attempt was repelled,” Saudi Press Agency reported on Sunday, citing the coalition.
The Houthis have stepped up cross-border attacks on southern Saudi Arabia since the start of the year with drones and missiles, and sometimes major cities like Riyadh and Jeddah, in what the coalition has said are “deliberate and systematic hostile attempts” which constitute war crimes.


Saudi Arabia approves mixing COVID-19 vaccine doses as 12 more deaths recorded

Saudi Arabia approves mixing COVID-19 vaccine doses as 12 more deaths recorded
Updated 23 June 2021

Saudi Arabia approves mixing COVID-19 vaccine doses as 12 more deaths recorded

Saudi Arabia approves mixing COVID-19 vaccine doses as 12 more deaths recorded
  • The Kingdom said 1,253 new cases reported and 920 patients recovered in past 24 hours
  • Najran police arrest four for violating quarantine rules after testing positive for coronavirus

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s National Committee for Infectious Diseases on Wednesday approved the possibility of mixing different COVID-19 vaccines for the first and second doses.
The Ministry of Health said the decision was taken according to international scientific studies that showed it was possible to give two doses of two different vaccines safely, while getting the effectiveness of which the second dose aims to be achieved.
The ministry added more than 16.9 million doses of the vaccine have been administered across the Kingdom through 587 centers so far.
Meanwhile, the Kingdom recorded 13 new COVID-19 related deaths on Wednesday, raising the total number of fatalities to 7,716.
The Ministry of Health reported 1,253 new confirmed cases reported in the Kingdom in the previous 24 hours, meaning 478,135 people have now contracted the disease. 
Of the total number of cases, 11,328 remain active and 1,472 in critical condition.
According to the ministry, the highest number of cases were recorded in Makkah with 363, followed by the Eastern Province with 263, the capital Riyadh with 165, Asir recorded 159, and Jazan confirmed 105 cases.
The health ministry also announced that 1,043 patients had recovered from COVID-19, bringing the total number of recoveries in the Kingdom to 459,091.

The ministry renewed its call on the public to register to receive the vaccine, and adhere to the measures and abide by instructions.
Police in Najran said four people have been arrested in the region for violating quarantine instructions after they tested positive for coronavirus.
Saudi Arabia has imposed penalties on those who disregard regulations enforced to prevent the spread of the virus; they are either fined up to SR200,000 ($53,330), face up to two years in prison, or have both sanctions imposed. Legal measures have been taken against those arrested and they will be referred to the Public Prosecution.
The Ministry of Islamic Affairs reopened nine mosques in five regions after temporarily evacuating and sterilizing them after nine people tested positive for coronavirus, bringing the total number of mosques closed and reopened after being sterilized to 1,636 within 137 days.
The coronavirus pandemic has affected over 180 million people globally and the death toll has reached around 3.90 million.


Saudi Arabia commits to AI, industrial revolution in meet with Italian experts

Saudi Arabia commits to AI, industrial revolution in meet with Italian experts
Updated 23 June 2021

Saudi Arabia commits to AI, industrial revolution in meet with Italian experts

Saudi Arabia commits to AI, industrial revolution in meet with Italian experts
  • Saudi tech leaders tell roundtable meeting that they have big ambitions for AI industry
  • Upcoming megaprojects such as NEOM will provide testing ground for AI

ROME: Saudi Arabia has committed to become a global leader in Artificial Intelligence (AI) during a roundtable discussion with Italian technology experts.

In the discussion on Tuesday, the Kingdom committed to becoming a dominant force in the field within the next eight years, in line with the Saudi Vision 2030 reform plans, and reaffirmed its interest in cooperating with Italy.

Robotics and AI were the main themes of the virtual roundtable, which was organized by the Saudi Center for International Strategic Partnerships, the Italian Embassy in Riyadh and the ICE Agenzia (The Italian Trade Commission), in collaboration with the Association Of Italian Manufacturers of Machine Tools, Robots, Automation Systems and Ancillary Products (UCIMU), the Italian Institute of Technology, and the Polytechnic Institute of Turin.

Saudi Arabia was represented by the Supervisor of the National Center for AI at the Saudi Data and AI Authority (SDAIA), Majed Al-Tuwaijri; the CEO of the National Industrial Development & Logistic Program, Suliman Al-Mazroua; the advisor to the Deputy Ministry of Industry and Mining Resources and head of the Industry 4.0 program, Dr. Majed A. Al-Gwaiz.

The Scientific Director of the Italian Institute of Technology Prof. Giorgio Motta, the President of UCIMU-Sistemi Per Produrre Dr. Barbara Colombo, and the director of the Hub for AI at the Polytechnic Institute of Turin, Prof. Barbara Caputo, represented the Italian side.

Saudi speakers said that the Kingdom has a strong foundation for its AI ambitions, based on the country’s assets and its position as an investment powerhouse. They added that the Kingdom also boasts a young population and the desire for large-scale programs.

Upcoming Saudi megaprojects, such as NEOM and smart cities, will provide a testing ground for advanced AI.

The speakers recalled that the SDAIA and Saudi G20 Secretariat organized the Global AI Summit in 2020, which provided the world’s premier platform for dialogue to shape the future of AI.

Saudi Arabia used the occasion to reveal its National Strategy for Data and AI, which aims to attract $20 billion in foreign and local investments by 2030.

Saudi speakers stressed that in relation to Industry 4.0, Saudi Arabia intends to attract expertise and encourage partnerships and investments to achieve the digital transformation of the industrial sector.

The Saudi Embassy in Rome said in a statement that the Kingdom plans to support the industrial revolution by implementing projects through investments of $453 million and allocations of $2.5 billion for the construction of digital infrastructure in the industry, mining, logistics, healthcare and energy sectors.

The main objectives are to increase the number of facilities able to benefit from the Industry 4.0 incentives from 10 in 2021 to 43 in 2025 and the development of four specialized centers for advancing new technology.

The Kingdom will also spend $800 million to convert 100 factories, with support guaranteed by the Saudi Industrial Development Fund.


Arabic calligraphy’s fusion with Japanese Kanji captures beauty of both worlds

Arabic calligraphy’s fusion with Japanese Kanji captures beauty of both worlds
Noha Raheem says when she was younger, she discovered the three famous Japanese written scripts — including Kanji, Katakana and Hiragana — and she was awestruck. (Supplied)
Updated 23 June 2021

Arabic calligraphy’s fusion with Japanese Kanji captures beauty of both worlds

Arabic calligraphy’s fusion with Japanese Kanji captures beauty of both worlds
  • My enthusiasm for Kanji script started six years ago, says Saudi designer and calligrapher Noha Raheem

JEDDAH: Saudi artist, designer and calligrapher Noha Raheem ventured into the world of calligraphy in an unconventional way, fusing her interest in Kanji — the logographic Chinese characters used in the Japanese writing system — with Arabic calligraphy.

The result has been a portfolio of unique and eye-catching works that capture the beauty of both worlds
“I’m fond of Arabic calligraphy and graphics in general. My enthusiasm for Kanji script started six years ago,” Raheem told Arab News.
“Any calligraphic font has its roles and system. When I was younger, I discovered the three famous Japanese written scripts — including Kanji, Katakana and Hiragana — and I was awestruck. The impressive vertical letters, the way they are formed and their meaningful symbols were like a secret code.”

FASTFACT

In Arabic calligraphy, writing proceeds from right to left and forms a horizontal line. Artists rarely confine themselves to convention, though.

In Arabic calligraphy, writing proceeds from right to left and forms a horizontal line. Artists rarely confine themselves to convention, though.
“For Kufic calligraphy and freestyle in Arabic, I was driven by passion. I was inspired by Hajji Noor Deen in my beginnings, and later on, I created Arabic calligraphy in the Kanji style to show the beauty and flexibility of this complex yet innovative mix,” Raheem said.


The self-taught calligrapher discovered the roles and philosophy behind the beauty of Kanji script. “It is said that the only rule for Japanese and Chinese calligraphy is that it is beautiful, no matter what is written. What matters is how it is written. That’s why I believe the Kanji style can be merged and fitted with our Arabic letters to create a masterpiece for both eye and mind,” she said.
She explained that Arabic letters are equally malleable. “They can be shaped in any way, and still keep their form and meaning. Today I wrote my letters in the Kanji style. Later, I might do it in Urdu just to show the world how flexible and beautiful Arabic letters are.”
Raheem’s artworks, including famous sayings and poetry in Arabic, are written freestyle — a tricky task.


She also writes Qur’anic verses in Kanji: “I love to write words that anyone can relate to, including poetry and short verses with iconic and universal messages. I can apply this art to any word, as long as it makes sense to me.”
Raheem is faithful to the cultures she draws inspiration from, using traditional Sumi ink and off-white, antique-style background colors with black script, or vice versa, to mirror the essence of the Japanese style.
She also uses Japanese calligraphy brushes, Xuan rice paper, and Kakejiku, a Japanese hanging scroll used to display and exhibit paintings and calligraphic inscriptions and designs.
Her love for and dedication to Japanese art drove her to share her knowledge and display her works at art cafes, galleries, and sushi restaurants in Saudi Arabia and Dubai.
She encourages other Arab artists to explore the beauty and flexibility of the Arabic language and preserve it through art. Raheem can be found at her Instagram account @noha_raheem.

Arabic calligraphy: Ancient craft, modern art
For the Saudi Ministry of Culture's Year of Arabic Calligraphy in 2020/21, we take an in-depth look at how the craft has developed from ancient to modern times.
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