Coalition launches rescue mission after floods kill 2 in southern Yemen

Yemeni men ride through a flooded street following heavy rainfall in the Yemeni capital Sanaa on May 26, 2019. (File/AFP)
Updated 10 June 2019

Coalition launches rescue mission after floods kill 2 in southern Yemen

  • Torrential rains, lightning and high winds have caused roadblocks in Aden
  • President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi has called on his government to implement an emergency budget to deal with the floods

DUBAI: At least two people died in Yemen after heavy rains and floods struck several parts of the country’s southern and eastern provinces on Sunday.

A person died of a tree falling on him, and another of the electric shock, local media reported.

Torrential rains, lightning and high winds have caused roadblocks in Aden and other neighboring provinces.

Yemen’s National Meteorological Center warned of “continuing turbulent weather,” stating that heavy rains with high winds might continue to hit the southern coast and the adjacent areas.

The center also warned residents “to take the necessary precautions from the flow of floods, low visibility and sea waves disturbance.”

Meanwhile, Col. Turki Al-Maliki, spokesperson for the Arab coalition fighting to support the legitimate government in Yemen, said the coalition has launched emergency relief operations for flood victims in Yemen.
An air bridge has been built to aid Yemenis affected by torrents and floods and a relief aircraft was sent from Riyadh to assist those affected.

President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi has called on his government to implement an emergency budget to deal with the floods while Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik Saeed inspected the damage caused by heavy rains in Aden.

The prime minister stressed the importance of all government agencies represented to redouble efforts and work as an integrated cell in the face of disaster and alleviate the suffering of citizens affected by the storm.


Troops halt Lebanese ‘revolution bus’ over security concerns

Lebanese anti-government protesters flash victory signs as they head to the south of Lebanon on a 'revolution' bus from central Beirut on November 16, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 17 November 2019

Troops halt Lebanese ‘revolution bus’ over security concerns

  • The protest convoy is aiming to reach Nabatieh and Tyre, two cities that have challenged Hezbollah and the Amal Movement in southern Lebanon during weeks of unrest

BEIRUT: A Lebanese “revolution bus” traveling from north to south to unite protesters was halted by troops outside the city of Sidon on Saturday.
The army set up a road block to prevent the bus and a large protest convoy entering Sidon, the third-largest city in the country.
Local media said that the decision had been made to defuse tensions in the area following widespread protests.
Lebanese troops blocked the Beirut-South highway at the Jiyeh-Rumailah checkpoint over “security concerns,” a military source told Arab News.
“Some people in Sidon objected to the crossing of the bus and we feared that problems may take place,” the source added.
A protester in Ilya Square in Sidon said: “Those who do not want the bus to enter Sidon should simply leave the square because there are many who want to welcome the bus.”
The army allowed the bus to enter the town of Rumailah, 2 km from Sidon. “The bus will stop here after nightfall because of security fears and the risk of an accident,” the military source said.
The protest convoy is aiming to reach Nabatieh and Tyre, two cities that have challenged Hezbollah and the Amal Movement in southern Lebanon during weeks of unrest.
Activists said the protest bus “is spreading the idea of a peaceful revolution by unifying the people.”
“The pain is the same from the far north of Lebanon to the south and the only flag raised is the Lebanese flag,” one activist said.
Organizers of the protest convoy rejected claims that the cities of Sidon, Nabatieh and Tyre were reluctant to welcome the bus, and voiced their respect for the Lebanese army decision.

After leaving Akkar the bus passed through squares that witnessed protests in Tripoli, Batroun, Jbeil, Zouk Mosbeh, Jal El Dib and Beirut. Protesters chanted “Revolution” and lined the route of the convoy, turning it into a “procession of the revolution.”
The bus paused in Khalde, where the first victim of the protests, Alaa Abu Fakhr, was shot and killed a few days ago by a Lebanese soldier. The victim’s widow and family welcomed the convoy and protesters laid wreaths at the site of the shooting.
Activists’ tweets on Saturday claimed that life in Beirut’s southern suburbs is as difficult as in other areas of Lebanon.
“As a Shiite girl living in the heart of the southern suburbs, I deny that we are living well and not suffering. We are in a worse position than the rest of the regions,” said an activist who called herself Ruanovsky.
“No one is doing well,” said Wissam Abdallah. “The suburbs have external security and safety, but unfortunately there is a lot of corruption. There are forged car van plates, motorcycle mafia, Internet and satellite mafia, royalties mafia, and hashish and drugs mafia. Municipalities have to deal with these things as soon as possible.”