Saudi Arabia and Russia studying new ‘working system’ for oil

There are suggestions that Russia, along with other countries, could join a restructured OPEC in the future, given weight by comments made by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. (AFP)
Updated 12 June 2019

Saudi Arabia and Russia studying new ‘working system’ for oil

  • Headed by Khalid Al-Falih and Alexander Novak, the meetings were the sixth occasion the Saudi-Russian intergovernmental committee has convened
  • The meetings come with both countries recognizing the need for closer cooperation given the volatile outlook for the global economy, trade and energy markets

DUBAI: High-level talks between policymakers from Saudi Arabia and Russia last weekend in Moscow are likely to herald cooperation across a range of economic, commercial and cultural areas — possibly including a permanent mechanism to coordinate on oil supplies.
Headed by Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih and his Russian opposite number Alexander Novak, the meetings were the sixth occasion the Saudi-Russian intergovernmental committee on economic, trade, scientific and technical cooperation has convened.
Al-Falih said there is “no doubt that the current situation at the global level, characterized once more by fluctuations, renders Saudi-Russian cooperation even more important. For this reason, we thoroughly look into setting a permanent working system among major oil producers, for future cooperation” in the global markets.
The talks involved around 50 technocrats and advisers on the Saudi side, with a similar number of Russians.
The meetings come with both countries recognizing the need for closer cooperation given the volatile outlook for the global economy, trade and energy markets.
At the end of the talks, Al-Falih said: “These meetings were held at a time when we have had more reasons to develop cooperation and integration, to achieve the goals set by both our countries.”
They followed talks in St. Petersburg between a top-level Saudi delegation and Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, who will visit the Kingdom in October.
“We, in the Saudi-Russian joint committee, completely agree that both the Russian ‘national projects,’ and the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 present new incentives, a big boost, and wider horizons to our efforts, due to the big similarities and possibilities of integration between the plans of the two countries,” Al-Falih said.
The topics discussed in Moscow covered investments in energy, petrochemicals, military industries, logistics and telecommunications, but also spanned “softer” areas like education and training as well as tourism and culture.

 

Some analysts took Al-Falih’s reference to a “new working system” as a suggestion that Russia and other oil-producing countries could become partners in a revamped version of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), which has helped regulate oil flows since 1960.
Robin Mills, CEO of consultancy Qamar Energy, said: “The Russians might want it for geopolitical reasons, the Saudis might want it for oil market management.”
David Hodson, managing director of energy finance firm BluePearl Management, said: “OPEC in its current form faces big challenges. A streamlined form would make the oil market easier to manage.”
There has been speculation before that Russia and others could join a restructured OPEC, and in 2018 Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said the Kingdom and Moscow were working on a “10 or 20-year agreement” on oil supply.
Currently 14 OPEC members are joined by 10 non-OPEC exporters in a deal to limit supply, which could be extended at a forthcoming meeting in Vienna, though both sides are still working on the details.
Apart from the oil market cooperation between Saudi Arabia and Russia, Al-Falih pointed to recent measures in the Kingdom over capital and investment flows from Russia, to improve entry procedures for businesspeople and move to electronic visas.
“(We) would like that the Russian side offers similar facilities to Saudi citizens, whether businessmen or investors, especially for those who are currently facing difficulties in getting Russian visas, due to long waiting periods, high tariffs, and inadequate visa time validity,” he added.
He also highlighted recent moves toward greater cooperation in renewable energy. There are also deals in the supply of agricultural produce, with Saudi Arabia set to become a major importer of Russian grain.
In tourism, Al-Falih said Saudi Arabia was keen to include Russia on the list of countries that can apply for the Kingdom’s new tourist visa, and would also like to encourage more Hajj and Umrah visitors from Russia.
In culture, Saudi Arabia has been chosen as guest of honor at the 2021 St. Petersburg Cultural Forum, having sponsored a prestigious art exhibition in the city last week.

FASTFACTS

There has been speculation before that Russia and others could join a restructured OPEC, and in 2018 the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said the Kingdom and Moscow were working on a “10 or 20-year agreement” on oil supply.


Technology will not replace labor despite rapid digital transformation

Updated 36 min 19 sec ago

Technology will not replace labor despite rapid digital transformation

  • Hayman said he believes technology should help people and offer them support rather than replace them
  • The UAE is among the top performers in the Middle East in terms of digital transformation in industrial sectors

ABU DHABI: Digital technology will not replace labor; the aim of it is to improve areas of inefficiency in different industrial sectors, CEO of AVEVA Group plc Craig Hayman told Arab News.

Most sectors around the world from retail to financial services and telecommunication, have been digitized in some way, according to Hayman.

But while this widespread introduction of digital technology inevitably reduces costs and increases efficiencies in the workplace, it is also seen by many as the death knell for their jobs.

A 2019 report by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) estimates that approximately 14 percent of workers globally will face a high risk of their jobs one day becoming automated and “32 percent face major changes in the tasks required in their job and, consequently, the skills they would need to do their job.”

Another 2017 McKinzy&Company report said up to 800 million workers around the world could be replaced by robots by 2030.

But Hayman said he believes technology should help people and offer them support rather than replace them.

“In the industries AVEVA serves, there are so many areas of inefficiency that we are delivering improvement for without any replacement of labor. It is more about giving the people more tools to effectively do their jobs,” he added.

For example, Hayman said, a worker who is doing maintenance repair is given the tools to know more about the correct isolation procedures around this repair.

OECD’s 2019 report said the effect of digitization on labor will not be evenly distributed nor happen at a steady pace. “It is most likely to be concentrated in certain jobs, selected sectors and particular geographical areas, and may move in fits and starts,” the report adds.

While digital technology around the world began to witness a transformation in the last decade across different industrial sectors, the Middle East has become a major contributor to this transformation.

The UAE is among the top performers in the Middle East in terms of digital transformation in industrial sectors, Hayman said.

A 2016 report by McKinzy&Company also said the UAE ranks the top in adopting digital technology and it matches the world’s digital leaders on several metrics.

Hayman said he believes there is a strong digital ambition in the region. “I think some of the digital projects in the Middle East are starting to yield good results. We have seen this with customers like Al-Marai and Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC).”

In the UAE’s oil and gas sector for example, there is ADNOC’s Panorama Digital Command Centre which is a real-time data visualisation centre that offers insights and identifies new ways to improve performance. “The Panorama Digital Command Centre is known around the world; that was an eight-week project for us almost two years ago,” Hayman said.

Abu Dhabi's Crown Prince Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan inaugurated ADNOC's advanced Panorama Command Centre and Artificial Intelligence (AI) platform on Nov 12, 2017. (WAM)

Saudi Arabia’s Aramco has also established tech projects such as “the use of robots and self-guided autonomous devices in remote inspection and maintenance in plant areas, and the installation of smart sensors with advanced analytic capabilities,” according to a 2018 report by Aramco.

When asked how much companies spend to digitize their services in the oil and gas sector, Hayman said about $250 billion a year was spent in capital expenditure in the oil and gas sector.

Saudi Arabia has adopted a digital transformation strategy that began in 2019 and is expected to conclude in 2022. The strategy’s “main components are digital health, digital education, e-commerce, and smart cities,” a 2019 report by the Saudi National Platform said.

On health, the Kingdom launched a telemedicine technology in which in 2019 it saved a million lives out of which 10,000 were critical, the Kingdom’s Minister of Communication and Information Technology Abdullah bin Amer Al-Swaha said in a panel discussion held in Davos at this year’s World Economic Forum.

Telemedicine is a technology that provides electronic clinical services to patients without an in-person visit.

In the digital education sector, Saudi Arabia established the Saudi Digital Library (SDL), which is said to be the largest collection of academic information resources in the Arab world, according to the Kingdom’s Ministry of Education. “SDL includes over 310,000 scientific references covering the different academic disciplines. The content of the library is continuously updated, providing huge resources of knowledge in the long run.”

When asked about the opportunities and challenges the digital trend creates for entrepreneurs, Hayman said if an entrepreneur can deliver technology in the context of trust and partnership, he or she is definitely moving on the right track.

A 2019 report by the World Economic Forum said digital technology can help the government and private sectors to create initiatives that form “a holistic global entrepreneurial ecosystem that enables sharing, learning and access to resources at a mass scale and at low cost.”