Sudan’s military council dismisses public prosecutor, appoints replacement

Sudan’s military council on Thursday dismissed public prosecutor Alwaleed Sayed Ahmed Mahmoud and appointed Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah to succeed him. (File/AFP)
Updated 20 June 2019

Sudan’s military council dismisses public prosecutor, appoints replacement

  • A top Sudanese general said Thursday that the mastermind behind a deadly crackdown on protesters has been identified, but refused to name him
  • Crowds of protesters were violently dispersed on June 3 by men in military uniforms, shooting and beating demonstrators who had participated in a weeks-long sit-in outside the army headquarters

CAIRO: Sudan’s military council on Thursday dismissed public prosecutor Alwaleed Sayed Ahmed Mahmoud and appointed Abdullah Ahmed Abdullah to succeed him, prosecution sources told Reuters.

The move comes as authorities investigate the dispersal of a protest camp outside the Defense Ministry in Khartoum that killed dozens on June 3.
A top Sudanese general said Thursday that the mastermind behind a deadly crackdown on protesters has been identified, but refused to name him saying it would impact a probe into the raid.
Crowds of protesters were violently dispersed on June 3 by men in military uniforms, shooting and beating demonstrators who had participated in a weeks-long sit-in outside the army headquarters.
Protesters and witnesses allege that the crackdown was carried out by members of the feared paramilitary Rapid Support Forces, whose commander Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo is the deputy chief of the country’s ruling military council.
But Dagalo, widely known as Himeidti, said on Thursday that an investigation into the crackdown has so far led to the identity of the man who planned the raid.
“We have identified the man responsible” for dispersing the protest camp, Dagalo said without naming the individual, adding “there’s no need to impact the investigation.”
“Whoever it is, whether from regular forces or a civilian, will be brought to trial. The investigation will be transparent and the trial will be public.”
The military council has steadfastly denied it had ordered the dispersal of the sit-in.
On Thursday also defended Rapid Support Forces saying anybody could wear the unit’s uniform as it was easily available in the market.
“We arrested a general yesterday for distributing IDs of the RSF,” Dagalo said.
“We have also arrested 23 people in Port Sudan who were not RSF members but who were wearing RSF uniforms and checking people.”
Dozens were killed and hundreds wounded in the June 3 crackdown, launched days after protest leaders and generals failed to reach an agreement over who should head a new governing body — a civilian or soldier.
The generals, who seized power after the army ousted longtime ruler Omar Al-Bashir on April 11 following a popular uprising, have so far resisted to transfer power to a civilian administration.
On Wednesday, the chief of the military council, General Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan called on protest leaders to resume talks without any conditions.
Protest leaders have expressed readiness to resume talks but on certain conditions.
They insist an Internet blackout imposed after they launched a civil disobedience campaign this month be brought to an end.
They are also seeking an international probe into the killings and the acceptance of all earlier agreements reached in previous negotiations with the generals prior to the crackdown.


Turkey says ready to send troops to back Libya unity govt

Updated 41 min 1 sec ago

Turkey says ready to send troops to back Libya unity govt

ANKARA: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Tuesday he was ready to send troops to Libya if requested by the internationally recognised government in Tripoli.
"On the issue of sending soldiers... If Libya makes such a request from us, we can send our personnel there, especially after striking the military security agreement," he said in a televised appearance.
Turkey signed a military agreement last month with Libya's Government of National Accord, led by Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj.
It came after media reports that Russia had sent 200 mercenaries to support Libya's military strongman Khalifa Haftar, who is seeking to unseat the Tripoli-based government.
Russia has denied the reports, but Erdogan said: "There is a security company from Russia (in Libya) called Wagner. This company sent its security staff there."
The Wagner Group is a shadowy private security firm and thousands of its security contractors are believed to be in foreign conflicts from Syria to Ukraine to the Central African Republic.
At the same time as the military deal, Turkey also signed a controversial maritime jurisdiction agreement with Sarraj, giving sweeping rights for Turkey to explore for oil in the Mediterranean.
"With the new line drawn (by the maritime agreement), we will take steps to protect the interests of Libya, Turkey and the TRNC (Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus). This is in line with international law," he said.
The deal has been staunchly opposed by Greece, Cyprus and their European partners which says it violates the islands' maritime rights.