Flynas celebrates Riyadh-New Delhi direct flights

The ceremony was attended by Saudi Arabia’s Deputy Head of Mission to India Tareq Rashwan as well as a delegation from India’s Directorate General of Civil Aviation and Flynas officials.
Updated 03 July 2019

Flynas celebrates Riyadh-New Delhi direct flights

Saudi national air carrier and low-cost airline Flynas recently celebrated the launch of new flights from Riyadh to New Delhi in India. The ceremony was attended by Saudi Arabia’s Deputy Head of Mission to India Tareq Rashwan as well as a delegation from India’s Directorate General of Civil Aviation and representatives of Flynas in India, along with a number of Saudi and Indian media personnel.

The increase in the number of flights seeks to meet the growing demand among passengers, especially because Indians are the fourth highest number of travelers in Saudi Arabia — around 3.3 million passengers.

Starting July 1, there will be five flights per week connecting Riyadh and New Delhi, and from October, there will be daily flights. Flynas has also increased flights between Riyadh and Hyderabad from two to four weekly flights.

“The addition of this new destination serves Flynas’ global expansion strategy to extend its geographic reach to meet passengers’ travel needs,” the airline said.

Flynas has added five new destinations this summer: Sarajevo, Vienna, Batumi, Tbilisi and Baku. Besides its geographic expansion, the airline also continues to upgrade its fleet. In 2018, it signed an agreement with Airbus to purchase 20 A321LR and A321XLR aircraft, in addition to a deal of more than $8 billion signed in 2017 to purchase 120 Airbus A320neo aircraft.

The new direct flights will take off from King Khalid International Airport to New Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport and Hyderabad’s Rajiv Gandhi International Airport. Flynas passengers can now book their flights through all booking platforms, including sales agents, the airline’s website and app, or by calling its call center.


Clinical trials to accelerate adoption of new drug treatments in Saudi Arabia

Updated 27 May 2020

Clinical trials to accelerate adoption of new drug treatments in Saudi Arabia

  • Trials are being led locally as an essential means to verify the safety and effectiveness of a new drug
  • Eli Lilly has a major role to play during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic

RIYADH: Clinical trials in Saudi Arabia could speed up the adoption of new drugs locally, a pharmaceutical executive has told Arab News.

“Clinical trials have two very big benefits for the Kingdom. Firstly, they provide data in the long run with respect to safety and efficacy, catered specifically to the Saudi population. Secondly, they impact local investment and build healthcare capabilities,” Managing Director of Eli Lilly Dimitri Livadas said..

Lividas further explained that the clinical trial phase of any new treatment is crucial as it represents the stage between the adoption or rejection of a drug. Working with the Ministry of Health and with a presence in the Kingdom for 42 years, the pharmaceutical company began research trials in the country in 2016, consisting of five pre-marketing activities and three monitoring studies for post-marketing.

Lividas added that the trials are being led locally as an essential means to verify the safety and effectiveness of a new drug before it is put to the market and introduced to patients. The majority of these are focused on diabetes, oncology, immunology, and osteoporosis.

“We genuinely believe that our future is here in Saudi Arabia. We continue to make great progress in having a commercial organization in the Kingdom that is fully staffed by Saudi nationals,” said Lividas.

As a biopharmaceutical company, Eli Lilly has a major role to play during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. It recently announced partnership with AbCellera to develop a treatment for the virus and aims to enter into clinical trials this year.

“I salute the Saudi authorities for their strong measures to contain the spread of COVID-19. I think it is an example to the world on how to do this. I would like to also express my gratitude toward all healthcare professionals who are currently on the frontlines, risking their own health to help others," Lividas said.