Makkah successfully reduces heat in pedestrian pathways at holy sites

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The Secretariat of the Holy Capital has implemented a project to apply a heat-blocking coating to pavement surfaces in pedestrian pathways at holy sites. (Supplied)
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The Secretariat of the Holy Capital has implemented a project to apply a heat-blocking coating to pavement surfaces in pedestrian pathways at holy sites. (Supplied)
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The Secretariat of the Holy Capital has implemented a project to apply a heat-blocking coating to pavement surfaces in pedestrian pathways at holy sites. (Supplied)
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The Secretariat of the Holy Capital has implemented a project to apply a heat-blocking coating to pavement surfaces in pedestrian pathways at holy sites. (Supplied)
Updated 25 July 2019

Makkah successfully reduces heat in pedestrian pathways at holy sites

  • The first phase of the project included coating the pedestrian pathway in Mina all the way to the Jamarat facilities, a total area of about 3,500 square meters
  • The director general of the holy sites and seasons, Ahmed Manshi, pointed out that the project is being implemented in cooperation with the Japanese corporation Sumitomo

RIYADH: The Secretariat of the Holy Capital has implemented a project to apply a heat-blocking coating to pavement surfaces in pedestrian pathways at holy sites.  
The first phase of the project included coating the pedestrian pathway in Mina all the way to the Jamarat facilities, a total area of about 3,500 square meters.
The director general of the holy sites and seasons, Ahmed Manshi, pointed out that the project is being implemented in cooperation with the Japanese corporation Sumitomo.
“The project aims to reduce the temperature of the pavement surface in Shaiben area, and there is a possibility to include the Jamarat facilities, and coat several pedestrian pathways at holy sites,” he said.
Manshi added that the project will help reduce the temperature by 15-20 degrees celsius, highlighting that the temperature will be recorded every 10 seconds during the season using sensors installed under the asphalt.
He explained that to measure the success of this project, surveys will be distributed to pilgrims during this year’s Hajj season.
“We have also coordinated with the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Institute for Hajj and Umrah Research to conduct a study on this experiment, recommend the possibility of expanding to other locations, and learn the most convenient sites for the secretariat to provide the service,” he said.
The project came after the completion of a network of pedestrian pathways extending from the Mount of Mercy (Jabal Al-Rahma) in Arafat to Mina, passing through Muzdalifah.
It aims to ensure the comfort, safety and security of pilgrims while they move between holy sites. The pathway has been paved using interlocking tiles, and benches are placed on both sides for pilgrims to rest.
Sunshades have also been installed to protect pilgrims from the sun, and concrete barriers have been placed to prevent vehicles from entering the pedestrian pathway. The pathway is lit using high-tech poles and LED beams, which are bright, cost-efficient when compared to ordinary lighting, and have low emissions.


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 16 September 2019

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.