Pakistan considering various options to counter India’s move in Kashmir – FM Qureshi

Shah Mehmood Qureshi, right, said he knows the implications that come with him making such statements. (AFP/File)
Updated 10 August 2019

Pakistan considering various options to counter India’s move in Kashmir – FM Qureshi

  • China says it will fully support Pakistan as Islamabad prepares to take Kashmir issue to United Nations
  • Qureshi asks Pakistanis to express solidarity with the people of Kashmir while celebrating independence day

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi said on Saturday that his government was considering various options to respond to India’s blatant violation of international law after the administration in New Delhi decided to annex the internationally recognized disputed territory of Jammu and Kashmir last Monday.
Qureshi was addressing a news conference in Islamabad after completing from his two-day visit to Beijing where he briefed the Chinese authorities on New Delhi’s attempt to change the demographic structure of Indian-administered Kashmir and sought diplomatic support from his country’s closest international ally.
China, a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, agreed to support Pakistan as Islamabad prepares to raise the Kashmir issue in the United Nations. Beijing also directed its representative in New York to maintain a close liaison with Pakistani diplomats on the issue.
Observing the deteriorating security situation in Indian-administered Kashmir, Qureshi said that Pakistan’s government was “considering other options” to tackle India’s breach of United Nations Security Council Resolution 47 on Kashmir.
Fearing bloodshed as protests by the people of Kashmir begin to gain momentum, the foreign minister said, “We anticipate a rise in tensions as things seem to be moving toward further escalation.”
He continued that Pakistan was not mulling a military response to the situation, though he also added that “we reserve the right to defend our country in case of any [Indian] misadventure.”
India’s recent move in Kashmir threatened regional peace and strained its already fragile relation with Pakistan. In response, Islamabad decided to expel the Indian high commissioner. It also suspended trade with its eastern neighbor and stopped the train service between the two countries.
The foreign minister expressed grave concern over the security lockdown in Indian-administered Kashmir and highlighted the resulting rights abuses in that territory. He also maintained that India’s “reckless approach” could lead to “false flag operations” in the area since it wanted to blame Pakistan for committing acts of “terrorism.”
Qureshi asked the people of Pakistan to raise the Kashmir flag along with their country’s national colors while celebrating the independence day to express solidarity with the oppressed people of Indian-administered Kashmir.


Pakistan army denies reports of joint border patrols with Iran

Updated 09 December 2019

Pakistan army denies reports of joint border patrols with Iran

  • Patrolling operations on respective sides are conducted by respective forces, military spokesman says
  • Last month, army chief visited Tehran for security talks

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan army spokesperson on Monday rejected media reports suggesting that Pakistani and Iranian security forces conducted joint border patrolling.
“News published by Dawn today ('Pak-Iran Forces jointly conduct border patrolling') is factually incorrect,” Director-General Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR), Maj. Gen. Asif Ghafoor, said in a tweet.
He added that “there is no joint patrolling anywhere on Pakistani borders” as “patrolling operations if required are always on respective sides by respective forces through coordination.”

The English-language daily reported earlier on the day that Pakistan and Iran had conducted another joint patrol on the border near Taftan town in Chagai district, Balochistan.
Soon after Ghafoor's comment, Dawn's editor Zaffar Abbas clarified that “the confusion was caused by the official news agency APP, as the picture caption said ‘joint patrolling.’ Radio Pak also tweeted the same. But we will be carrying out correction in light of your statement.”

Border security has long been a major cause of distrust in Pakistan-Iran relations. 
In April, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani announced that the two countries would form a joint quick-reaction force to combat militant activity on their shared border, following a deadly attack on Pakistani security personnel on the coastal highway in southwestern Balochistan, where 14 soldiers lost their lives.
On Nov. 18, Pakistan army chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa visited Tehran for security talks with Iran's political leadership and military leadership.
In May this year, Pakistan began the fencing of certain areas along the 950-kilometer border it shares with Iran.