Saudi classical literature translated into Mandarin so the Chinese can see

1 / 4
The event was held in cooperation with the Center for Research and Intercommunication Knowledge in Riyadh. (SPA)
2 / 4
The event was held in cooperation with the Center for Research and Intercommunication Knowledge in Riyadh. (SPA)
3 / 4
The event was held in cooperation with the Center for Research and Intercommunication Knowledge in Riyadh. (SPA)
4 / 4
The event was held in cooperation with the Center for Research and Intercommunication Knowledge in Riyadh. (SPA)
Updated 24 August 2019

Saudi classical literature translated into Mandarin so the Chinese can see

  • Three books have been translated from Arabic into Mandarin
  • THe books are of Saudi classical literature

BEIJING: The Chinese have been given an insight into Saudi classical literature with the help of three books that have been translated into Mandarin.

The three books were presented at a ceremony organized by the Beijing Teachers Qualification Publishing House.

The event was held in cooperation with the Center for Research and Intercommunication Knowledge in Riyadh, and the Department of Arabic Language at Beijing University for Foreign Studies.

It was attended by the Saudi ambassador to China, Turki Al-Madi, the President of the Center for Research and Intercommunication Knowledge, Yahya bin Junaid, as well as other Chinese officials.


What We Are Reading Today: Floating Coast  by Bathsheba Demuth

Updated 16 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Floating Coast  by Bathsheba Demuth

Whales and walruses, caribou and fox, gold and oil: Through the stories of these animals and resources, Bathsheba Demuth reveals how people have turned ecological wealth in a remote region into economic growth and state power for more than 150 years.

The first-ever comprehensive history of Beringia, the Arctic land and waters stretching from Russia to Canada, Floating Coast breaks away from familiar narratives to provide a fresh and fascinating perspective on an overlooked landscape, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

The unforgiving territory along the Bering Strait had long been home to humans — the Inupiat and Yupik in Alaska, and the Yupik and Chukchi in Russia — before Americans and Europeans arrived with revolutionary ideas for progress. 

Rapidly, these frigid lands and waters became the site of an ongoing experiment: How, under conditions of extreme scarcity, would the great modern ideologies of capitalism and communism control and manage the resources they craved?