Saudi troops return home as Eager Lion military exercise concludes in Jordan

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The Eager Lion 2019 military exercise concluded in Amman on Friday in the presence of the commander of US Central Command, Gen. Kenneth McKenzie. (SPA)
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The Eager Lion 2019 military exercise concluded in Amman on Friday in the presence of the commander of US Central Command, Gen. Kenneth McKenzie. (SPA)
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The Eager Lion 2019 military exercise concluded in Amman on Friday in the presence of the commander of US Central Command, Gen. Kenneth McKenzie. (SPA)
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The Eager Lion 2019 military exercise concluded in Amman on Friday in the presence of the commander of US Central Command, Gen. Kenneth McKenzie. (SPA)
Updated 06 September 2019

Saudi troops return home as Eager Lion military exercise concludes in Jordan

  • The commander of the Saudi forces said the exercise developed participants’ ability to plan and execute joint operations
  • Personnel from the Saudi army, navy, air force and air defense partook in activities

AMMAN: The Eager Lion 2019 military exercise concluded in Amman on Friday in the presence of the commander of US Central Command, Gen. Kenneth McKenzie, and the heads of delegations participating in the exercise from 30 other countries.
8,000 took part in the exercise at various locations across Jordan.
Personnel from the Saudi army, navy, air force and air defense partook in activities, alongside members of the security forces of the US, UK, Italy, France, Germany, Spain, Belgium, Japan, South Korea, Jordan and Egypt.
Brig. Gen. Jaafar bin Hadi Al-Qahtani, commander of the Saudi forces, said that the exercise accomplished many objectives, including developing the participants’ ability to plan and execute joint operations, and exchange experiences between the Saudi armed forces and their international counterparts.
Saudi security personnel successfully completed exercises aimed at improving their skills in combating terror, and received training in fighting in cities, freeing hostages, planning and responding to electronic warfare, implementing strategic bombing operations, sniper training and weapons of mass destruction protection training.
They also carried out joint operations and training related to international maritime security, psychological warfare and monitoring and destroying remote-controlled devices.
“The exercises simulate reality and live ammunition was used during most of them,” Al-Qahtani added.


Jazan’s coffee bean production expected to reach 300 tons in 2020

Al-Dayer accounts for 80 percent of Jazan’s coffee production. The number of farmers in the region has exceeded 700. (Photos/Supplied)
Updated 10 min 24 sec ago

Jazan’s coffee bean production expected to reach 300 tons in 2020

  • Coffee bean trees are planted and cultivated at an altitude of 800-2,000 meters above sea level

JAZAN: The seventh Coffee Beans Festival starts on Jan. 30, amid expectations that more than 300 tons of coffee beans will be produced and enter the Saudi market by the end of 2020 due to increased production in the Jazan mountains.
“This year’s festival is completely different in terms of activities, with more focus on displaying the local products of Saudi coffee bean farmers,” Dr. Mefarah Al-Malki, director of the festival, told Arab News.
“There are new programs to turn the spotlight on the achievements of Saudi young men and women.”
Award-winning coffee farmer Hussain Hadi Al-Malki, from Al-Dayer governorate, said the Jazan region produced 250 tons of coffee beans last year, but this year production will reach 300 tons.

FASTFACTS

• Coffee bean trees are planted and cultivated at an altitude of 800-2,000 meters above sea level. The higher the altitude, the greater the yield and quality. 

• Coffee bean trees need special care, and take up to five years from the time a seed is planted until production.

He added that Al-Dayer accounts for 80 percent of Jazan’s coffee bean production, and that the number of coffee farmers in the region has exceeded 700.
Coffee bean trees are planted and cultivated at an altitude of 800-2,000 meters above sea level. The higher the altitude, the greater the yield and quality.
Coffee bean trees need special care, and take up to five years from the time a seed is planted until production.
Hussain said coffee trees should be pruned properly, and their top branches should be cut off so the tree is not taller than 2 meters.
“Planting coffee trees in the Kingdom faces several challenges such as labor, water for irrigation and costs. There are no real capital investments in this field,” he told Arab News.
“Farmers need support from the time they grow coffee beans to the yield stage in order to cover associated expenses and costs.”