What We Are Reading Today: The Geography of Risk by Gilbert M. Gaul

Updated 09 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Geography of Risk by Gilbert M. Gaul

Hurricanes and other coastal storms create more costly damage than do earthquakes, tornadoes and wildfires combined, and 17 of the 20 most destructive hurricanes in history have occurred since 2000. 

“The Geography of Risk will forever change the way you think about the coasts, from the clash between economic interests and nature, to the heated politics of regulators and developers,” said a review in goodreads.com. 

“This book is fairly comprehensive in its history of coastal development, with particular emphasis on the back bays of New Jersey but also discussing development all the way South to Florida and up along the Florida Gulf Coast all the way to Galveston Bay and Houston, with detailed discussions of Mobile and New Orleans along the way,” said the review. 

“And even discounting its heavy emphasis on global warming/global cooling/climate change ... whatever the alarmists are calling it these days, the book paints a stark picture about just how much coastal redevelopment costs people all over the country n the post-Second World War era,” said the review. 

 

 


What We Are Reading Today: Kill Reply All by Victoria Turk

Updated 18 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Kill Reply All by Victoria Turk

Victoria Turk’s Kill Reply All “is one of the more amusing digital-etiquette books you’ll read,” says a review in The New York Times. 

“Simply put, social media has created a new universe of ways we can be mean to one another. So digital good manners are a great kindness, whether they apply to friends, work or love,” it added.  

Turk “provides an indispensable guide to minding our manners in a brave new online world, and making peace with the platforms, apps, and devices we love to hate,” said another critic.

A review in goodreads.com said the digital revolution “has put us all within a few clicks, taps, and swipes of one another. But familiarity can breed contempt, and while we’re more likely than ever to fall in love online, we’re also more likely to fall headfirst into a raging fight with a stranger or into an unhealthy obsession with the phones in our pockets. If you’ve ever encountered the surreal, aggravating battlefields of digital life and wondered why we all don’t go analog, this is the book for you.”