New Bentley Continental GT blends luxury, technology

Courtesy of its powerful V8 petrol engine, the Continental GT V8 blends a lively and engaging drive with luxury and cutting-edge technology.
Updated 10 September 2019

New Bentley Continental GT blends luxury, technology

Bentley has announced new model year details and the introduction of new features for its Continental GT and the GT V8.

A panoramic glass roof is now available on the Continental GT W12, while high-gloss carbon fiber technical finish for fascia and doors is now offered on all models.

Courtesy of its powerful V8 petrol engine, the Continental GT V8 blends a lively and engaging drive with luxury and cutting-edge technology.

The V8 model has recently launched on Bentley’s car configurator, where customers can explore the vast array of options available to build a car matching individual tastes, needs and lifestyles. Often regarded as one of the most configurable cars available, the Continental GT has 7 billion different configurations possible. 

The panoramic glass roof is offered as a cost option — starting at £3,150 ($3,870) — on the Continental GT Coupe W12. 

The sunroof is equipped with polarized glass that reduces glare allowing the passenger a clearer view of their surroundings, and an interior blind that is electronically operated from the console for when they wish to feel cocooned by the cabin of their Continental GT. The blind is clad in Alcantara that matches one of the 15 headliner colors available from the Bentley palette.

A further stylish option available on all Continental GT models is a high-gloss carbon fiber technical finish.  The Continental GT V8 is equipped with a new-generation 4-liter, twin-turbocharged engine developing 542 bhp (550 PS) and 568 lb.ft (770 Nm) of torque. It combines immense power with impressive fuel efficiency, plus a characterful V8 burble though the stylish quad exhaust pipes.

Designed, engineered and handcrafted in Crewe, Great Britain, the third generation Continental GT V8 and GT V8 Convertible combine driver-focussed performance with exquisite refinement and cutting-edge technology.

“The third-generation Continental GT represents the pinnacle of Bentley’s design and engineering achievements and sits in the modern luxury Grand Tourer segment that the British brand created in 2003 with the launch of the first-generation model.

Excellent weight distribution makes the dynamic GT V8 feel even more agile and responsive,” a press release said.

The new-generation 4-liter, 32-valve V8 petrol engine delivers a top speed of 198 mph (318 km/h) and 0-60 mph in 3.9 seconds (0-100 km/h in 4.0 seconds) for the Coupe; and 0-60 mph in 4.0 seconds (0-100 km/h in 4.1 seconds) for the Convertible.

The new V8 features 20-inch, 10-spoke painted alloy wheels and the option to choose from nine other designs measuring up to 22-inches. Both Coupe and Convertible models are distinguished by quad exhaust pipes and subtle V8 badging to the front wings.

The GT V8 comes with an advanced, fully digital, driver-focused instrument panel and the optional Bentley Rotating Display. The latter features a 12.3-inch touchscreen housed in a three-sided unit, which revolves from the veneer to reveal the touchscreen, as well as three analogue dials.


Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

An international team of KAUST researchers studied whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for ‘Rope Reef’), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea on the Saudi Arabian coast.
Updated 18 November 2019

Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), whale sharks are considered endangered, which means the species has suffered a population decline of more than 50 percent in the past three generations. The whale shark is only two classifications from being extinct. Improvements and conservation efforts are in place, but there is still a long way to
go to protect these gentle underwater giants.
An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency using a combination of three scientific techniques: Visual census, acoustic monitoring and satellite telemetry.
Their six-year study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, tracked long-term whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for “Rope Reef”), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea. The team monitored a total of 84 different sharks over a six-year period, and their results shed light on whale shark behaviors,
which could help to inform conservation efforts.
“The study takes years of passive acoustic monitoring data and combines it with previously published visual census and satellite telemetry data from the same individual sharks. The combined dataset is used to characterize the aggregation’s seasonality, spatial distribution, and patterns of dispersal,” said Dr. Michael Berumen, director of the Red Sea Research Center and professor of marine science at KAUST.

HIGHLIGHT

An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency.

They found the aggregation to be highly seasonal, with sharks being most abundant in April and May, and that many of the sharks returned to the hot spot regularly year after year. The study also shows roughly equal numbers of male and female sharks using the site, something that could be unique to Shib Habil. These characteristics indicate that this site may serve an important function for the wider Indian Ocean population of this rare and endangered species.
“Using the combined dataset, we can show somewhat conclusively that the aggregation meets all of the criteria of a shark nursery. This is particularly relevant given that Shib Habil is the only site in the Indian Ocean to regularly attract large numbers of juvenile females. Growing late-stage adolescents of both sexes into full adulthood is critical for sustaining a species. Management of critical habitats like Shib Habil and other aggregations will likely be vital for future whale shark conservation,” said KAUST graduate Dr. Jesse Cochran, lead author of the study.
There is a combination of factors contributing to the decrease of whale shark populations world-wide, including targeted fishing, bycatch losses due to fisheries, vessel strikes from boat traffic, marine debris, and pollution.