Highlights from ‘The Collector’s Eye VI’ at Cairo’s Ubuntu Gallery

Ubuntu Gallery is open until September 14. (Courtesy: Instagram)
Updated 11 September 2019

Highlights from ‘The Collector’s Eye VI’ at Cairo’s Ubuntu Gallery

Here are some highlights from ‘The Collector’s Eye VI’ at Cairo’s Ubuntu Gallery that is open until September 14. 

Seif Wanly

The sixth edition of Ubuntu’s annual ‘Collector’s Eye’ exhibition includes work from a number of well-known modern and contemporary Egyptian artists, including this piece from the late Seif Wanly, who — together with his brother Adham — is regarded as one of the founders of Egyptian modern art.

Ragheb Ayad

Ayad is one of the most significant artists in Egypt’s recent history. Before his death in 1982, aged 90, he had helped to establish a thriving modern-art movement in his country, and his depictions of everyday life and nature had begun to shift artistic representation of Egypt away from the Orientalists.

Vassela Farid

Although she was originally from Belgium, Farid moved to Egypt in 1938, and came to be regarded as a true Egyptian artist before her death, aged 93, in 2007. Her figurative portraits of Egyptian women, in particular, showed a deep affinity for, and understanding of, her adopted home.


What We Are Reading Today: Floating Coast  by Bathsheba Demuth

Updated 26 min 58 sec ago

What We Are Reading Today: Floating Coast  by Bathsheba Demuth

Whales and walruses, caribou and fox, gold and oil: Through the stories of these animals and resources, Bathsheba Demuth reveals how people have turned ecological wealth in a remote region into economic growth and state power for more than 150 years.

The first-ever comprehensive history of Beringia, the Arctic land and waters stretching from Russia to Canada, Floating Coast breaks away from familiar narratives to provide a fresh and fascinating perspective on an overlooked landscape, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

The unforgiving territory along the Bering Strait had long been home to humans — the Inupiat and Yupik in Alaska, and the Yupik and Chukchi in Russia — before Americans and Europeans arrived with revolutionary ideas for progress. 

Rapidly, these frigid lands and waters became the site of an ongoing experiment: How, under conditions of extreme scarcity, would the great modern ideologies of capitalism and communism control and manage the resources they craved?