Muslim World League, evangelicals discuss ways to promote coexistence

The meeting was held on the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, and aimed to discuss ways to promote international coexistence and harmony. (SPA)
Updated 12 September 2019

Muslim World League, evangelicals discuss ways to promote coexistence

  • MWL and the delegation stressed their common values and pledged to promote cooperation in this context

JEDDAH: The secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL), Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa, met Joel Rosenberg, head of a delegation of evangelical Christian leaders, in Jeddah on Wednesday. The meeting was held on the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, and aimed to discuss ways to promote international coexistence and harmony.
In a joint statement, the MWL and the delegation stressed their common values and pledged to promote cooperation in this context.
They stressed the need to renounce all forms of extremism and hatred, and work together to build bridges between peoples from all religions and cultures.
The two sides agreed to promote respect for religions and mutual trust, and committed to address obstacles to coexistence and put an end to violence through education and encouraging religious harmony and cultural, racial and national integration.
Both sides stressed the importance of family in building a successful society and raising generations with the values of moderation, love and respect for others.
The statement said broad citizenship guarantees justice for all, and the constitution and rule of law should be respected in all countries.
It stressed the importance of places of worship worldwide, and the need to prosecute all who attack them.
The two sides agreed to establish and encourage programs and initiatives to combat hunger, poverty and disease.
The two sides acknowledged the right to personal freedom as long as it does not lead to mistreating others, especially on the basis of religion, culture or race.  
On Tuesday, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman met Rosenberg and the delegation. They stressed the importance of joint efforts to promote coexistence and tolerance, and to combat extremism and terrorism.


Saudi customs train dogs to sniff out infected air travelers

Saudi Health Ministry officials distribute roses to people following precautionary measures to prevent coronavirus. (Supplied)
Updated 05 August 2020

Saudi customs train dogs to sniff out infected air travelers

  • 1,983 critical cases reported, death toll reaches 2,984

JEDDAH: Saudi Customs officials are taking the lead in identifying air travelers harboring the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) — by using specially trained sniffer dogs.

The canine virus detectors are being drafted in at airports throughout the Kingdom to help pick up the scent of infected passengers.
Following the resumption of international flights, customs staff in Saudi Arabia are to use the animals as part of their efforts to stop the spread of the deadly virus.
The customs authority, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), has been training Jack Russell terriers and other breeds to recognize the odor of COVID-19.
“The training has been 80 percent successful,” said Mohammed Al-Salloum, director of the National Center for Living Means at Saudi Customs, adding that final preparations were being put in place for the dog teams to start work in airport terminals throughout the country.
Meanwhile, the Saudi Ministry of Health on Tuesday announced 1,342 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, taking the total number in the Kingdom to 281,435.
Of the latest cases, 97 were recorded in Riyadh, 56 in Makkah, 53 in Madinah and Hafr Al-Batin, and 51 in Dammam, with 40 percent of them women. There were 34,763 active cases, with most patients in a stable condition, and 1,983 critical.
The number of people who have recovered from COVID-19 increased to 243,688 with 1,635 of those being in the latest 24-hour period. The Kingdom reported 35 new COVID-19-related deaths, raising the overall toll to 2,984.
The ministry said it had carried out 54,325 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests over 24 hours taking the total number of checks conducted since the outbreak to 3,528,040.