Film Review: ‘Marriage Story’ paints love and loss with levity

Updated 18 September 2019

Film Review: ‘Marriage Story’ paints love and loss with levity

VENICE: A French photo-journalist once told me that her former husband would come to her place to mend things — a broken tap, an electrical short-circuit — and she quipped that if only he had been as attentive during his married life, they would have never got divorced. Noah Baumbach’s latest film “Marriage Story,” screened at the Venice Film Festival and the Toronto International Film Festival, explores the same issue — of a how, whilst a marriage can turn stale, love can remain.

When Charlie (Adam Driver) and Nicole (Scarlett Johansson) meet a marriage counsellor, he asks them to list each other’s plus points. She is a great listener, an infectious dancer. He is a superb dresser and dotes on their son. But despite all this, Charlie and Nicole separate, and since the law bars her from handing over the divorce papers to him, she gets her mother and sister to do that. The moment is awkward, it is heartbreaking. Charlie is a Brooklyn theater director, she is his company’s leading lady. Although Charlie and Nicole want things to be absolutely amicable, their lawyers will not let that happen.  

Baumbach’s work is tough (also inspired by his own divorce from actress Jennifer Jason Lee), but poignant and painful, underlining in red how money and the law can make a mess of things. 

Cinematographer Robbie Ryan’s lens does a wonderful job of capturing some of the finest moments, dipped in sweet nostalgia, as the husband and wife talk about each other. Baumbach does not let bitterness creep in. On the contrary, he livens up the script with fantastic humor, making sure that “Marriage Story” does not turn into a sob story. There is intimacy, there is dynamism to get us hooked to the screen, and we remain all eyes for 136 minutes, with the final scenes likely to leave audiences floored. 


Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall: ‘I was bullied for being Arab’

The singer's maternal grandfather is Yemeni and maternal grandmother Egyptian. (Getty)
Updated 05 June 2020

Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall: ‘I was bullied for being Arab’

DUBAI: Girl group Little Mix’s star Jade Thirlwall has opened up about bullying she experienced as a teenager due to her Arab roots.

Speaking on the BBC “No Country For Young Women” podcast, the 2011 “X-Factor” finalist, whose maternal grandfather is Yemeni and maternal grandmother Egyptian, said that she felt “ashamed” of her background. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

oh hey it’s me shamelessly plugging #BreakUpSong for the 1847th time via a thirst trap pic

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“When I went to secondary school, I was literally one of three people of color in the school,” the 27-year-old music sensation, whose father is British, said.

“I remember one time I got pinned down in the toilets and they put a bindi spot on my forehead; it was horrific.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

look in the notebook.

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“I have constantly had this inner battle of not really knowing who I am, or where I fit in, or what community I fit into,” she said.

The singer recalled that she would put white powder on her face “to whiten” herself when performing on stage at her school.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

finding a new love for my natural hair⚡️

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After joining Little Mix, she “subconsciously” did not want to talk about her heritage for fear of being disliked.

“I think because I was bullied quite badly in school because of the color of my skin and for being Arab, I wasn’t very proud of who I was,” Thirlwall explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

category is: 80s realness @madison_phipps

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“I would hate to talk about my race and heritage and not say the right things,” she added.