FBI ask public to help identify victims as US serial killer confesses to 93 murders

1 / 3
This combination of undated sketches provided by the FBI shows drawings made by admitted serial killer Samuel Little, based on his memories of some of his victims. Little, who claims to have killed more than 90 women across the country, is now considered to be the deadliest serial killer in U.S. history, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said. (AP)
2 / 3
In this Monday, Nov. 26, 2018 file photo, Samuel Little, who often went by the name Samuel McDowell, leaves the Ector County Courthouse after attending a pre-trial hearing in Odessa, Texas. (AP)
3 / 3
This combination of undated sketches provided by the FBI shows drawings made by admitted serial killer Samuel Little, based on his memories of some of his victims. Little, who claims to have killed more than 90 women across the country, is now considered to be the deadliest serial killer in U.S. history, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said. (AP)
Updated 09 October 2019

FBI ask public to help identify victims as US serial killer confesses to 93 murders

  • One unidentified victim was described by investigators as a black man aged 18 or 19 who presented himself to Little as a woman named Marianne or Mary Ann. He was slain in 1971 or 1972

LOS ANGELES: The FBI is asking for the public’s help in identifying dozens of victims of a convicted murderer who has confessed to strangling 93 people, claims the agency says are credible and make him the most prolific serial killer in US history.
Investigators who have interviewed Samuel Little at a Los Angeles-area prison say they have confirmed 50 of the homicides he admitted to carrying out between 1970 and 2005 and have released videotapes of his jailhouse confessions as they investigate the remaining slayings.
“Even though he is already in prison, the FBI believes it is important to seek justice for each victim — to close every case possible,” the FBI said in a statement posted to its website, which also includes drawings made by Little, 79, of many of the women he strangled.
Little, who is serving life behind bars for his conviction on three murders committed in the 1980s, began confessing additional killings some 18 months ago to a Texas Ranger who interviewed him in his cell at the state prison in Lancaster, California, according to the FBI.
He appears to have targeted mostly vulnerable young black women, many of them prostitutes or drug addicts, whose deaths were not well-publicized at the time and in some cases not recorded as homicides.
The FBI videotapes show Little, sitting in front of a cinder block wall in blue jail scrubs and a gray knit cap, sometimes appearing bemused or smiling as he recalls the circumstances surrounding the murders.

The FBI has also released sketches made by Little of victims who remain unidentified in hopes that members of the public might recognize them. The agency cautioned that not all Little’s descriptions may be accurate as his memory is faulty.
A map posted on the FBI website shows that most of the still uncorroborated murders were committed across the US South, although one young woman was killed in northern Ohio and two others in Southern California.
One unidentified victim was described by investigators as a black man aged 18 or 19 who presented himself to Little as a woman named Marianne or Mary Ann. He was slain in 1971 or 1972.
Another was a 25-year-old white woman with blonde hair, blue eyes and a “hippie appearance” whom Little met in Ohio and strangled to death in northern Kentucky in approximately 1984.
It was not yet clear if Little, who is in failing health, will face additional prosecutions in the newly uncovered murders. 

To see more videos, check the FBI website.


India, Pakistan exchange fire in Kashmir, killing 9

Updated 39 min 40 sec ago

India, Pakistan exchange fire in Kashmir, killing 9

  • Pakistan’s army later said that “unprovoked cease-fire violations” by Indian troops killed five civilians and one soldier
  • India and Pakistan have a long history of bitter relations over Kashmir

SRINAGAR, India: Pakistani and Indian soldiers traded fire in disputed Kashmir on Sunday, killing at least nine people on both sides, officials said.
The Indian military said Pakistani soldiers targeted an Indian border post and civilian areas along the highly militarized frontier in Kashmir early in the day, leaving two army soldiers and a civilian dead.
Col. Rajesh Kalia, an Indian army spokesman, said three Indian civilians were also injured in the Pakistani firing. Kalia called it an “unprovoked” violation of a 2003 cease-fire accord between India and Pakistan.
Pakistan’s army later said that “unprovoked cease-fire violations” by Indian troops killed five civilians and one soldier and wounded another three civilians and two troops across the highly militarized Line of Control that divides Kashmir between Pakistan and India.
The army said Indian troops targeted civilians in Jura, Shahkot and Nousehri sectors. It said Pakistani forces responded with heavy fire on Indian soldiers.
India and Pakistan have a long history of bitter relations over Kashmir, which is divided between the rivals but claimed by both in its entirety. The renewed fighting comes amid an ongoing lockdown in Kashmir that was put in place after India stripped the region of its semi-autonomy in early August.
Since then, soldiers from the two nations have regularly engaged in cross-border shelling and firing along their de facto frontier in Kashmir, where rebel groups are fighting for the territory to be united either under Pakistani rule or as an independent country. In the past, each side has accused the other of starting the hostilities in violation of the 2003 accord.
India accuses Pakistan of arming and training anti-India rebels and also helping them by providing gunfire as cover for incursions into the Indian side. Pakistan denies this, saying it offers only moral and diplomatic support to Kashmiris who oppose Indian rule.
Rebels have been fighting Indian rule since 1989. Nearly 70,000 people have been killed in the armed uprising and the ensuing Indian military crackdown.
On Aug. 5, India’s Hindu nationalist-led government stripped Kashmir of its semi-autonomous status and imposed a strict crackdown, sending in tens of thousands more additional troops to the region, which is already one of the highest militarized zones in the world. India has arrested thousands of activists and separatist leaders in the days leading up to and after the revoking of Kashmir’s special status.
More than two months later, the region remains under a communications blockade. Authorities have restored landline and some cellphone services, but the Internet remains suspended.