Dubai to get its own Monopoly board

The game is released in stores on Nov. 5. (Supplied)
Updated 09 October 2019

Dubai to get its own Monopoly board

DUBAI: Dubai is set to get its very own version of one of the world’s most recognizable board games, Monopoly.

A life-size Mr. Monopoly mascot landed in the city this week and will make his way around Dubai’s hotspots before the new board is unveiled on Nov. 4 and the game is released in stores on Nov. 5.




Mr. Monopoly mascot landed in the city this week. (Supplied)

Fans have the opportunity to meet the mascot by tracking #MrMonopolyinTown and #MonopolyDXB on Instagram.

Issam Kazim, CEO of the Dubai Corporation for Tourism and Commerce Marketing, said: “This internationally recognized… game will not only promote the city’s diverse destination offering to a global audience, but Monopoly’s newest board will provide both visitors and residents with an exciting new way to discover the city.”

 


‘Arabs Are Not Funny’ comedy show just the opposite

Taking the stage at London’s lavish Royal Albert Hall were mixed Arab-Western comedians. (Supplied)
Updated 22 February 2020

‘Arabs Are Not Funny’ comedy show just the opposite

LONDON: Don’t let the name fool you, Friday night’s “Arabs Are Not Funny” comedy show was filled with nothing but quick-witted, snarky and overly-relatable quips. 

Taking the stage at London’s lavish Royal Albert Hall were mixed Arab-Western comedians Wary Nichen, Leila Ladhari, Mamoun Elagab and Esther Manito, with Iraqi-Scottish Sezar Alkassab hosting. 

The sold-out show started off with the host forcing the zaghrouta (a long, wavering, high-pitched vocal sound of joy) out of the audience, after encouraging them to “laugh at our culture and enjoy yourself.”

Sudanese-Irishman Elagab, who was recently nominated for BBC New Comedian of the Year, kicked off the night with a comedic look back at his upbringing in the UK, dealing with extremists in class, and the struggle of explaining stand-up comedy to his Sudanese uncle.

The sold-out show started off with the host forcing the zaghrouta. (Supplied)

Lebanese-Brit Manito humored the audience with stories of the struggle of taking her British husband to Beirut to meet her relatives, raising two children as an Arab mom, and having her Lebanese father living with her family yelling and cursing at the TV and on the phone. 

Tunisian-Swiss-Austrian Ladhari joked about her boyfriend’s father trying to bond with her by trying to sympathize with Daesh and letting her know that he “too doesn’t like eating pork.”

The highlight of the night was Algerian-Frenchman Nichen, who spoke of his job as a fulltime immigrant and the racism he endures in daily life in Paris. 

The show was organized by Arts Canteen, an organization that curates and produces events, exhibitions and festivals that support emerging, mid-career and established artists from the Arab world and surrounding regions, bringing their work to new audiences in the UK and beyond.