Egyptian-French designer at FFWD talks taking inspiration from Japan

Updated 02 November 2019

Egyptian-French designer at FFWD talks taking inspiration from Japan

  • Mrs. Keepa made its debut three years ago
  • The FFWD showing comes at an important time for Mrs. Keepa which has found its niche in the region

DUBAI: Egyptian-French designer Mariam Yeya started her career in the corporate world but her innate sense of cool style meant she was regularly on regional best-dressed lists.

Seeing a gap in the market, she decided to launch her own label, Mrs. Keepa, also the name of her much-followed Instagram account.

But Yeya is more than an influencer with her own fashion label brand. Her big sister Yasmine is a well-known fashion designer too, with her Maison Yeya workshop based in Cairo, so Yeya knew that launching a label was about a lot more than just dressing well.




Seeing a gap in the market, Yeyadecided to launch her own label, Mrs. Keepa. (Supplied)

She decided to enroll at the French fashion design school Esmod Dubai in order master the technical side of the business, and Mrs. Keepa made its debut three years ago. Soon after, she showed at one of the region’s most important fashion platforms, Fashion Forward Dubai (FFWD), and Yeya is there again this year.

Mrs. Keepa has a cosmopolitan vibe, drawing from her own background, but is still very much a label that pays homage to the region.

The first collection was an ode to Dubai’s architecture. Long, high-waisted trousers resembled the UAE city’s skyscrapers with their slick endless lines. The bell-shaped sleeves of one of her blouses were inspired by the beautiful curves of the iconic Burj Al Arab.

While Yeya said there was no specific inspiration behind her Fall/Winter 2019 collection that she will present at FFWD on Saturday, there will be lots of exaggerated silhouettes that have a very Japanese feel.




Mrs. Keepa has a cosmopolitan vibe, drawing from her own background. (Supplied)

“My mood board and inspiration process don’t follow a certain criterion. It’s a very random process where lots of ‘brain-archived’ ideas come out at the fabric purchase or design draping stage,” she added.

Mrs. Keepa is about timeless pieces that are not trend driven yet have a very au courant feel. “After reaching a wide audience and gaining trust within the region, we have expanded our in-house operation to meet with the growing orders demand,” she said.

The FFWD showing comes at an important time for Mrs. Keepa which has found its niche in the region and is preparing to expand into its own retail channels. Yeya will shortly be opening two standalone stores in Dubai.

 


Archaeologists unveil possible shrine to Rome’s first king

Updated 21 February 2020

Archaeologists unveil possible shrine to Rome’s first king

  • Possible shrine to Romulus is found at the heart of Rome, on the site of the old Roman forum
  • The founder of Rome was abandoned by the banks of the river Tiber, before being nursed back to health by a she-wolf

ROME: Archaeologists said on Friday they had discovered an ancient cenotaph that almost certainly commemorated the legendary founder of Rome, Romulus, buried in the heart of the Italian capital.
The small chamber containing a simple sarcophagus and round stone block was originally found at the start of the last century beneath the Capitoline Hill inside the old Roman forum.
However, officials say the significance of the find has only just become clear following fresh excavations and new research.
Alfonsina Russo, the head of the Colosseum Archaeological Park, said the site probably dated back to the sixth century BC, and was located in the most ancient part of the city which was directly linked in historical texts to Rome’s first king.
“This area is highly symbolic. This surely cannot be Romulus’ tomb, but it is a place of memory, a cenotaph,” Russo told Reuters TV.
The shrine is buried beneath the entrance to the Curia, one of the meeting places for Roman senators which was subsequently converted into a church — a move that protected it from being dismantled for its stones as happened to other forum buildings.

The underground chamber was also located close to the “Lapis Niger,” an antique slab of marble that was venerated by Romans and covered a stone column that was dedicated to “the King” and appeared to curse anyone who thought to disturb it.
Russo said the Roman poet Horace and ancient Roman historian Marcus Terentius Varro had related that Romulus was buried behind the “rostra” — a tribune where speakers addressed the crowd in the forum. “The rostra are right here,” she said.
No body was found in the sarcophagus, which was made of volcanic tuff rock, but according to at least one legend, Romulus vanished into the sky following his death to become the God Quirinus, meaning that possibly he never had a tomb.
According to the myth, Romulus and his brother Remus, the sons of the god Mars, were abandoned by the banks of the river Tiber where a she-wolf found them and fed them with her milk.
The brothers are said to have founded Rome at the site in 753 BC and ended up fighting over who should be in charge. Romulus killed Remus.