Cardiff face long transfer ban if they miss Sala payment

People look at yellow flowers displayed in front of the portrait of Argentinian forward Emiliano Sala at the Beaujoire stadium in Nantes. (AFP)
Updated 04 November 2019

Cardiff face long transfer ban if they miss Sala payment

  • Cardiff and Nantes were unable to reach an amicable conclusion on the financial aspects of the move, so the case came before the Players’ Status Committee (PSC) of FIFA
  • The world governing body announced on September 30 that Cardiff must pay an initial €6 million to the French club

LONDON: Cardiff City face a three-window transfer ban unless they pay the first instalment of the €17 million ($19M) transfer fee for Emiliano Sala to Nantes.
The Argentine, 28, died when the light aircraft he was traveling in from France to Britain crashed into the English Channel in January.
Cardiff and Nantes were unable to reach an amicable conclusion on the financial aspects of the move, so the case came before the Players’ Status Committee (PSC) of FIFA.
The world governing body announced on September 30 that Cardiff must pay an initial €6 million (£5.2 million) to the French club.
Documents published on Monday, detailing the grounds for the decision, show that failure by Cardiff to pay the fee within 45 days of receiving bank details from Nantes following the ruling would mean “a ban on registering new players, either nationally or internationally, up until the due amounts are paid and for the maximum duration of three entire and consecutive registration periods.”
According to a source close to Nantes, the French club sent bank details to Cardiff “at the beginning of October,” which would mean the Welsh outfit has until mid-November to make the payment and thereby avoid a transfer ban. “Nantes expect everyone to fulfil their commitments and that the amount due to them is paid,” the source told AFP.
Cardiff confirmed on Monday they would lodge an appeal against the decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) within the next two weeks.
They said the act of announcing they would appeal had effectively stopped the clock on the 45-day countdown.
The Championship club have argued that Sala was not officially their player when he died.
However, the PSC found that all the terms within the transfer agreement concluded between Cardiff and Nantes had been fulfilled.
The documents also show that Cardiff had sought a delay in the case until any other civil or criminal investigations into Sala’s death had been completed.
But the PSC ruled that the dispute before it was “of a purely contractual nature” and that “Cardiff had not been able to prove that the outcome of those local proceedings would be relevant to the outcome of the dispute pertaining to whether or not a transfer fee is due.”
The full fee payable for Sala was 17m euros, according to the FIFA documents.
The light aircraft Sala was traveling on came down during a night-time flight. His body was recovered, but that of the pilot, David Ibbotson, has never been found.
A report by Britain’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch said Sala and the pilot were likely exposed to “potentially fatal” levels of carbon monoxide on the plane.
In the aftermath of the tragedy, Cardiff were relegated from the Premier League after just one season back in the top flight.


Fury and Wilder weigh in big for their big heavyweight fight

Updated 22 February 2020

Fury and Wilder weigh in big for their big heavyweight fight

  • The two unbeaten heavyweights meet in a showdown just 14 months after they fought to a draw in a dramatic fight in Los Angeles

LAS VEGAS: Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder made one last appearance Friday before their big heavyweight title fight, weighing in and taunting each other before a raucous crowd at the MGM Grand arena.
Wilder weighed 231 pounds, the heaviest of his career, for his 11th title defense. Fury, meanwhile, tipped the scales at 273 pounds, just 3 pounds short of his heaviest ever, too, for Saturday night’s rematch.
The fighters jawed at each other from a distance after getting on the scales in the arena. Nevada boxing officials ruled they would not have a faceoff after pushing each other at the final press conference on Wednesday.
Thousands of fans, most of them supporting Fury, jammed the arena, waiting for several hours for the fighters to make their brief appearance on the scales. Though separated, the two fighters jawed at each other, much like they did at the press conference promoting the pay-per-view bout.
``I just told him, `24 hours, 24 hours,’’’ Wilder said. ``He’s nervous, nervous energy as always.’’
The two unbeaten heavyweights meet in a showdown just 14 months after they fought to a draw in a dramatic fight in Los Angeles. The fight is arguably the biggest heavyweight bout since Lennox Lewis demolished Mike Tyson in 2002, and both fighters could make some $40 million if the pay-per-view sells well.

Wilder weighed in at 231 pounds. (AFP)

Fury weighed in 16.5 pounds heavier than the first fight, and just 3 pounds short of what he weighed in his first comeback fight in 2018 after being out of the ring with drug and alcohol problems. Wilder was also heavier than expected, weighing 18.5 pounds more than the first fight.
``The weight’s not a problem,’’ the 6-foot-9 Fury said. ``It’s 273 pounds of pure British beef.’’
A fight that promises intriguing matchups matches two fighters with claims to titles — Fury’s is the mythical lineal crown — in a rematch of their draw a little more than a year ago. In that fight, Fury dominated the boxing but Wilder knocked him down in the ninth and 12th rounds before the judges scored it a draw.
Fury (29-0-1, 20 knockouts) predicted in the weeks leading up to the fight he would weigh about 270 pounds. He said he added the weight because he intends to go after Wilder from the opening bell in the rematch to try and score an early knockout.
``At the end of the day, we’re heavyweights,’’ Wilder said. ``So it doesn’t really matter about the weight.’’
In addition to the weight, Fury will have to deal with the possibility of the cut suffered around his right eye in his last fight will reopen. He usually trains without headgear but used it for the rematch because of the 47 stitches it took to sew the cut up after his hard-fought win in September against Sweden’s Otto Wallin.
Wilder (42-0-1, 41 knockouts) is making the 11th defense of the crown he won in 2015, the same year Fury beat Wladimir Klitschko to win a piece of the title. Fury didn’t fight for more than two years after that, giving up his crown as he descended into mental and drug problems and his weight ballooned to 375 pounds.