New H&M tagline sparks outcry over gender violence association

The launch of a collection by Italian designer Giambattista Valli for H&M in Paris on Nov. 7. (Reuters)
Updated 12 November 2019

New H&M tagline sparks outcry over gender violence association

KUALA LUMPUR: A new collection from fashion giant H&M has unleashed protests from women’s rights campaigners because it includes the slogan “I love GBV,” the initials of the designer but also a widely used acronym for gender-based violence.

H&M said the slogan, emblazoned on hats, a necklace and boxer shorts with a red heart symbolising the word “love,” was an abbreviation of Italian designer Giambattista Valli and any other associations were unintentional.

But women’s rights activists demanded the products be withdrawn saying it was “crazy” to keep selling them. “This is not an obscure term. It’s very commonly used as a short hand for gender-based violence,” said Heather Barr, the women’s rights division co-director at global advocacy group Human Rights Watch.

The Swedish retailer launched the clothing line on Nov. 7 in its first collaboration with Rome-born Valli, known in the fashion world for its ready-to-wear and haute couture pieces.

“We condemn any type of violence, and as a value driven company, we believe in an inclusive and equal society,” H&M said.


TWITTER POLL: People remain divided on whether to fly amid coronavirus pandemic

Updated 31 min 15 sec ago

TWITTER POLL: People remain divided on whether to fly amid coronavirus pandemic

  • People remain split over whether they intend to fly
  • Some airlines have been operating but with strict health and safety measures

DUBAI: Many airlines have started commercial flights again, but an Arab News Twitter poll revealed that people remain split on whether they are prepared to get on board.

Of the 572 people who took part in the two-day poll, just over 23 percent said there was no way they would even consider flying again, despite assurances from airlines that all precautions against the coronavirus were being taken.

Dubai’s Emirates airline is among those that have reintroduced some flights – as has Abu Dhabi’s Etihad – but both are operating strict health and safety regulations.

And while some airlines and countries might be open for business, in many cases this is still dependent on individual people testing negative for COVID-19 tests before they are allowed to travel.

 

 

That has not put off more than 38 percent of those who responded to the poll saying they were off on their holidays, while nearly the same amount said they would wait for a while before traveling.

Now take our new poll: