Touring showcase of Saudi culture and heritage arrives in Rome

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The exhibition in Rome featured 450 rare artifacts. (SPA)
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The exhibition in Rome featured 450 rare artifacts. (SPA)
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The exhibition in Rome featured 450 rare artifacts. (SPA)
Updated 29 November 2019

Touring showcase of Saudi culture and heritage arrives in Rome

  • “The exhibition provides an opportunity to learn more about the rich cultural history of both Saudi Arabia and Italy”

ROME: Prince Badr bin Abdullah, the Saudi minister of culture, on Tuesday officially opened an exhibition in Rome featuring 450 rare artifacts that showcase the cultural development and heritage of the Kingdom.

In his speech at The National Roman Museum during the inauguration of The Roads of Arabia: Masterpieces of Antiquities in Saudi Arabia across the Ages, the prince said: “We hope the exhibition’s visitors will find their passions satisfied in a journey that will take them to all the Kingdom’s historical periods, from the Stone Age to its unification by the founding king.”

He added: “My country is experiencing a major cultural renaissance, with the support of its leadership.” Prince Badr described Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman as “the leader of our cultural renaissance,” whose support for “the arts and culture sector in the Kingdom comes from a strong belief in its importance in building bridges between nations and cultures.”

He continued: “The exhibition provides an opportunity to learn more about the rich cultural history of both Saudi Arabia and Italy. We are confident that the exhibition will contribute to increasing understanding of the shared history between the Kingdom and Italy through the ages.”

Other dignitaries at the inauguration included Dario Franceschini, the Italian minister of cultural heritage and activities. The traveling exhibition was launched at the Louvre in Paris in July 2010. Rome, where it will remain for three months, is the 17th location it has visited, and it has welcomed 5 million visitors.

The Kingdom’s Ministry of Culture, which organized the exhibition in cooperation with other official bodies, said the event aims to highlight Saudi culture, promote cultural exchange, preserve artifacts and ensure their status as national treasures, and underline the Kingdom’s commitment to preserving its cultural heritage

The staging of the exhibition in Rome, the ministry added, reflects the long-standing cultural relations between Saudi Arabia and Italy, and continues the historical connections that link Arab civilization with the city of art and culture.
 


Recent archaeological discoveries highlight Saudi Arabia as ‘a cradle of human civilizations,’ Rome conference told

Updated 54 min 17 sec ago

Recent archaeological discoveries highlight Saudi Arabia as ‘a cradle of human civilizations,’ Rome conference told

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has become a leader in the field of archaeological research in the past five years, a major exhibition in Rome was told.

Abdullah Al-Zahrani, director-general of archaeological research and studies at the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, said that 44 international archaeological missions had been carried out this year in the Kingdom.

He was speaking on the sidelines of the “Roads of Arabia: Masterpieces of Antiquities in Saudi Arabia Across the Ages” exhibition, which opened at the National Museum of Rome on Nov. 26.

The groundbreaking exhibition was inaugurated by Saudi Minister of Culture Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan and Italian Minister of Cultural Heritage and Activities Dario Franceschini.

Al-Zahrani said that the Kingdom “has become one of the most advanced countries in terms of archaeological disclosures.”

“Recent discoveries by local and international missions have highlighted the Kingdom’s historical status and cultural depth as the cradle of the beginnings of human civilizations,” he said.

Archaeological discoveries continue to “instil the civilized dimension of the Kingdom,” he said.

“The religious, political, economic and cultural stature that Saudi Arabia enjoys is an extension of its long cultural heritage, in addition to its distinctive geographical position as a bridge and hub of cultural interaction between East and West that made it a meeting point for international land and sea trade routes throughout all ages,” he added.