US rapper Tyga hospitalized in Abu Dhabi

Tyga was hospitalized in the UAE following back-to-back performances in Abu Dhabi and Riyadh. AFP
Updated 02 December 2019

US rapper Tyga hospitalized in Abu Dhabi

  • American rapper Tyga has revealed that he's been hospitalized in the UAE
  • He uploaded a series of snaps on his Instagram Stories of himself wearing a surgical mask at a hospital in Abu Dhabi

DUBAI: Following his second performance in Saudi Arabia, rapper Tyga has recently shared that he’s been hospitalized in the UAE.

The “Taste” singer was in the UAE capital for an appearance in the side lines of F1 on Saturday night, the same day he performed at Riyadh’s Diriyah Season.

On Sunday, he uploaded a series of snaps on his Instagram Stories of himself wearing a surgical mask at a hospital in Abu Dhabi. He simply captioned the first shot with a crying emoji and a sick emoji.

“Thank you for the doctors in Abu Dhabi for treating me w the best care (sic),” he wrote alongside the second clip.




The rapper shared two snaps of himself wearing a surgical mask. Photo: Instagram/@Tyga

It’s unclear why the rapper has been admitted into the medical institution, but if his trip to a hospital in India last week is any indication, it could very well be from exhaustion.

According to the Times of India, Tyga—born Michael Ray Stevenson— told fans at his Mumbai concert that he was “feeling under the weather.”

While it’s not yet known whether the rapper is still in the hospital or not, he is expected to take the stage in Hamburg tonight. 


What We Are Reading Today: Race Is About Politics Jean-Frederic Schaub

Updated 21 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Race Is About Politics Jean-Frederic Schaub

  • Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination

Racial divisions have returned to the forefront of politics in the US and European societies, making it more important than ever to understand race and racism. 

But do we? In this original and provocative book, acclaimed historian Jean-Frédéric Schaub shows that we don’t— and that we need to rethink the widespread assumption that racism is essentially a modern form of discrimination based on skin color and other visible differences.

On the contrary, Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination. Built around notions of identity and otherness, race is above all a political tool that must be understood in the context of its historical origins.

Although scholars agree that races don’t exist, they disagree about when these ideologies emerged. Drawing on historical research from the early modern period to today, Schaub makes the case that the key turning point in the political history of race in the West occurred not with the Atlantic slave trade and American slavery, as many historians have argued, but much earlier, in 15th-century Spain and Portugal, with the racialization of Christians of Jewish and Muslim origin.