EU weighs response to Turkey-Libya maritime border deal

The maritime border deal was endorsed by the Turkish parliament last week. (File/AFP)
Updated 09 December 2019

EU weighs response to Turkey-Libya maritime border deal

  • The maritime border deal has fueled tensions in Turkey’s long-running dispute with Greece, Cyprus and Egypt over oil and gas drilling rights in the eastern Mediterranean
  • Greece, Cyprus, and Egypt, which lie between Turkey and Libya geographically, have blasted the accord as being contrary to international law

Brussels: European Union foreign ministers debated Monday how to respond to a controversial agreement between Turkey and Libya that could give Turkey access to a contested economic zone across the Mediterranean Sea.
The maritime border deal, endorsed by the Turkish parliament last week, has fueled tensions in Turkey’s long-running dispute with Greece, Cyprus and Egypt over oil and gas drilling rights in the eastern Mediterranean. Greece has already expelled the Libyan ambassador over it.
Before chairing the meeting, new EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell said that “it’s not a matter of sanctions today.” He said the ministers would study a “memorandum of understanding” agreed upon between Turkey and Libya, which was only made public in recent days.
Austrian Foreign Minister Alexander Schallenberg said “it’s a little bit astounding how they split up the Mediterranean among themselves. We’ll have to see how we deal with it.”
Greece, Cyprus, and Egypt, which lie between Turkey and Libya geographically, have blasted the accord as being contrary to international law. Some EU partners of Greece and Cyprus seem to agree.
“The Netherlands is always a staunch supporter of the rule of international law, and we side with Greece,” said Dutch Foreign Minister Stef Blok. “International law should be upheld.”
Although they are NATO allies, neighbors Greece and Turkey are divided by a series of decades-old issues, including territorial disputes in the Aegean Sea, and have come to the brink of war three times since the 1970s, including once over drilling rights in the Aegean.


Muslim World League chief leads delegation to Auschwitz for Holocaust memorial

Updated 36 min 3 sec ago

Muslim World League chief leads delegation to Auschwitz for Holocaust memorial

  • Al-Issa and the CEO of the AJC David Harris led the tour to the Auschwitz-Birkenau memorial
  • The interfaith visit came four days before the 75th anniversary of the camp’s liberation by Soviet forces on Jan. 27, 1945

LONDON: The secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL) led a delegation of Muslim leaders on an interfaith visit to Auschwitz on Thursday.
The visit was part of commemorations for the 75th anniversary of the camp’s liberation from the Nazis.
Mohammed bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa addressed Muslim leaders and delegates from the US Jewish group the American Jewish Committee (AJC) at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Poland.
“To be here, among the children of Holocaust survivors and members of the Jewish and Islamic communities, is both a sacred duty and a profound honor," Al-Issa said.
“The unconscionable crimes to which we bear witness today are truly crimes against humanity. That is to say, a violation of us all, an affront to all of God’s children.”
Al-Issa and the CEO of the AJC David Harris led the tour to the Auschwitz-Birkenau memorial.
Harris said the visit led by Al-Issa was the “most senior Islamic leadership delegation to ever visit Auschwitz or any Nazi German death camp.”
The AJC said that Al-Issa led a delegation of 62 Muslims, including 25 prominent religious leaders, from some 28 countries during the visit.
The interfaith visit came four days before the 75th anniversary of the camp’s liberation by Soviet forces on Jan. 27, 1945, and as world leaders gathered in Jerusalem to commemorate the Holocaust.
The Nazis operated extermination and concentration camps in Poland when Germany occupied the country during World War II.
Al-Issa also led prayers next to the memorial monument honouring the more than one million people - mostly European Jews -that Nazi Germany killed at Auschwitz.
The Jewish group’s delegation included children of Holocaust survivors.