What We Are Reading Today: Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

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Updated 11 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist.

It is also the story of that young man’s relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother— his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life, according to review published on goodreads.com.

The 18 personal essays collected in this book are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Noah illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty.

His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time.


What We Are Reading Today: After the Last Border

Updated 09 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: After the Last Border

Author: Jessica Goudreau

After the Last Border — written by Jessica Goudreau — is an intimate look at the lives of two women as they struggle for the 21st century American dream, having won the “golden ticket” to settle as refugees in Austin, Texas.
The book casts a light on the history of the refugee relocation process, and how it has changed throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
The writer “tracks the human impacts of America’s ever-shifting refugee policy as both women narrowly escape from their home countries and begin the arduous but lifesaving process of resettling in Austin — a city that would show them the best and worst of what America has to offer,” said said a review in goodreads.com.
“These women are so empowering. Their stories can give others a lot of inspiration,” it added.
After the Last Border “offers a crash course in how shifts in public attitudes and, in turn, US policy have helped and hindered people desperate to escape the poverty or violence in their homelands,” Mimi Swartz said in a review for The New York Times.