What We Are Reading Today: Uncanny Valley

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Updated 04 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Uncanny Valley

Author: Anna Wiener

Anna Weiner’s Uncanny Valley is a memoir of working in Silicon Valley in her mid-20s.
“Part coming-age-story, part portrait of an already-bygone era, Wiener’s memoir is a rare first-person glimpse into high-flying, reckless startup culture at a time of unchecked ambition, unregulated surveillance, wild fortune, and accelerating political power,” said a review in goodreads.com.
“With wit, candor, and heart, Anna deftly charts the tech industry’s shift from self-appointed world savior to democracy-endangering liability, alongside a personal narrative of aspiration, ambivalence, and disillusionment,” said the review.
Wiener’s story “lends significant insight into this world, which at times feels very much like an alternate reality from the rest of the country.”
Lauren Oyler said in a review for The New York Times that just as Wiener wants to believe that tech can solve the world’s problems, she is sympathetic to the Bay Area’s “new-school old-schoolers” who are “sorting out a way to live,” obsessed with “radical honesty,” “processing” and “checking in.”


What We Are Reading Today: Race of Aces by John R. Bruning

Updated 16 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Race of Aces by John R. Bruning

This is the astonishing untold story of the Second World War airmen who risked it all in the deadly race to become the greatest American fighter pilot, according to critics.

John R. Bruning’s story focuses on Richard Bong, Tommy McGuire, Neel Kearby, Charles MacDonald, and Gerald Johnson, who through training, became the deadliest aces during the Pacific War. 

Race of Aces “is an educational, powerful, and intense read, with a behind-the-scenes look at the Southwest Pacific Theater of Operations in the Second World War,” said a review in goodreads.com.

It added: “In the early years of the war, air forces from the US, Australia, and Japan engaged in an unrelenting struggle for superiority in the skies over New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. Allied forces were operating under primitive conditions in a largely unknown and noxious physical environment.”

Bruning “explores the technology and tactics, the multi-dimensional battlefield, and the leadership, living conditions, medical challenges, and morale of the combatants,” said the review.