Quoz Arts Fest returns to Alserkal Avenue featuring regional talents

Quoz Arts Fest is held on Jan. 24 and 25 in the UAE’s Alserkal Avenue. (Supplied)
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Updated 24 January 2020

Quoz Arts Fest returns to Alserkal Avenue featuring regional talents

  • During the festival, visitors will be able to bring their creative designs to life on stone or camel leather at the high-end footwear brand Tamashee’s workshop
  • The program includes a free concert by Jordanian-Palestinian band 47Soul, the exhibition “New National Dish: UAE,” Reel Palestine Film Festival screenings, a contemporary dance performance by Sima Dance Company, and much more

DUBAI: More than 60 creatives will lead the two-day Quoz Arts Fest held on Jan. 24 and 25 in the UAE’s Alserkal Avenue, which will feature exhibitions, live music, contemporary dance performances, food trucks, outdoor art installations, film screenings, and educational seminars.

During the festival, visitors will be able to bring their creative designs to life on stone or camel leather at the high-end footwear brand Tamashee’s workshop, which explores the “contemporary application of ancient art and Arabian scripts of the Peninsula.”




Visitors will be able to bring their creative designs to life on stone or camel leather at the high-end footwear brand Tamashee’s workshop. (Supplied)

Tamashee, owned by Saudi entrepreneur Muneera Al Tamimi and Emirati Mohammed Kazim, will give visitors a chance to participate in a 12,000-year-old form of expression at heir activation wall, inspired by their “1441 H” collection, which references archeology, rock art, and ancient inscriptions of the Arabian Peninsula.

In its eighth edition, the festival explores the theme “In Search Of…,” with special programs including a free concert by Jordanian-Palestinian band 47Soul, the exhibition “New National Dish: UAE,” Reel Palestine Film Festival screenings, a contemporary dance performance by Sima Dance Company, and much more.

47Soul, who will take the stage in The Yard, on Jan. 24, combines traditional Dabke music with electronic beats. The band is best-known for creating the Shamstep, a combination of mijwiz–a Levantine folk musical style– and dubstep.




47Soul, who will take the stage in The Yard, on Jan. 24, combines traditional Dabke music with electronic beats. (Supplied)

The “New National Dish: UAE” exhibition presents four imagined proposals for a new Emirati national dish, based on the environmental, economic and social impacts of climate change.

Visitors to the exhibition will get to try the food and discuss the future of popular dishes.




The “New National Dish: UAE” exhibition presents four imagined proposals for a new Emirati national dish, based on the environmental, economic and social impacts of climate change. (Supplied) 

The contemporary dance performance Ansaf, set to take place on Jan. 24, is created by acclaimed Palestinian choreographer Alaa Krimed and explores questions and concepts facing the Arab world.


‘Love on the Spectrum’ is heartfelt, authentic and real

Updated 15 August 2020

‘Love on the Spectrum’ is heartfelt, authentic and real

DHAHRAN: Right on the heels of “Indian Matchmaking,” Netflix acquired streaming rights to Australian dating show “Love on the Spectrum” for a global audience. While these releases offer minority groups visibility and representation in mainstream media (the Indian diaspora and adults on the autism spectrum, respectively) the latter takes a nuanced and thoughtful approach to matchmaking.

“Love on the Spectrum” is also a refreshing departure from the Netflix brand of glamorous, hypersexual reality TV as endorsed by “Too Hot to Handle” and “Love is Blind,” both of which were released earlier this year.

First released on the Australian Broadcast Corp. last fall, the unscripted show follows seven singles on the autism spectrum as they look for love and companionship, and two autistic couples as they make momentous relationship decisions.

“Love on the Spectrum” is also a refreshing departure from the Netflix brand of glamorous, hypersexual reality TV. Supplied

Unobtrusive and done respectfully, the show offers insight into their lives and vulnerabilities — what autism on the spectrum looks like for each individual, the challenges they face in social situations, and why they seek companionship. Alongside heart-warming interviews with participants and their families, the episodes feature first dates, mixer events and sessions with autism or relationship experts.

The highlight of the show remains raw human emotions and the participants’ endearing personalities that shine through. One cannot help but laugh out loud at 25-year-old Michael’s one-liners that double as sage advice.

The highlight of the show remains raw human emotions and the participants’ endearing personalities. Supplied

But while these “quirks” seem loveable and endearing to a neuro-typical audience, autistic audiences have voiced that in their quest to make a show interesting, these snippets romanticize high-functioning autism and disregard Level 3 autism (the most severe). They have also voiced a desire to see an autistic and non-autistic pairing.

At the outset, a show that follows autistic young adults in the dating world may not seem like something one can relate to. But as the five-part docuseries unravels, one can agree that the universal experience of navigating the dating world and finding love is difficult — autistic or not. With awkward first dates and heartbreak, “Love on the Spectrum” is heartfelt, authentic and real, and therein lies the appeal of the show.