Dash cam culture on the rise in Saudi Arabia

The camera serves as the best evidence that can be presented to authorities when accidents take place or when a violation is committed. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 08 February 2020

Dash cam culture on the rise in Saudi Arabia

  • Most of these violations are shared on social media with the traffic department through its official Twitter account @eMoroor’ and public security account @kamnapp

JEDDAH: Dash cams are gaining popularity in Saudi Arabia as people install them to record violations, car accidents and dangerous actions to share on social media.
It is a clear sign that people are fed up with reckless drivers who put citizens and residents in harm’s way and are hoping to catch violators.
The camera installed on the front or back dashboard of the vehicle acts as a silent witness to record every detail that takes place in front of the camera. It serves as the best evidence that can be presented to authorities when accidents take place or when a violation is committed.
More commonly used in the West, there are thousands of clips on YouTube and social media of road accidents on the road, dangerous driving and road rage incidents.
Alongside Saher cameras, the automated speed cameras used in major cities to catch violators of traffic laws, dash cams are another technology in the fight against road violations. Most of these violations are shared on social media with the traffic department through its official Twitter account @eMoroor’ and public security account @kamnapp.

HIGHLIGHT

Alongside Saher cameras, the automated speed cameras used in major cities to catch violators of traffic laws, dash cams are another technology in the fight against road violations. Most of these violations are shared on social media with the traffic department through its official Twitter account @eMoroor’ and public security account @kamnapp.

Videos circulating on social media under an Arabic hashtag that roughly translates as “dash cam catches” or “dash cam recordings” document drivers veering a sharp left at a traffic light while on the furthest righthand lane, driving on the wrong side of the road, aggressively switching lanes without signaling, tailing, road rage, driving on the hard shoulder and more.
In a recent clip a dash cam installed in a parked car documented a theft from another car. Activated by a motion sensor, it recorded two youths who were walking round a parking area at night, behaving suspiciously. In less than 10 seconds, they snatched the car wheel covers from both sides and walked away, not knowing that the dash cam had recorded it all.
One dash cam store owner said he noticed a noticeable increase in dash cam sales as drivers are becoming more aware of how to protect themselves from fraud, theft and traffic violations that they have no control over.


Saudi Arabia delays May crude prices until after OPEC+ meeting

Updated 05 April 2020

Saudi Arabia delays May crude prices until after OPEC+ meeting

  • OPEC and allies are due to meet on Thursday to discuss a possible new global crude supply cut

DUBAI: Saudi Aramco will delay the release of its crude official selling prices (OSP) for May until April 10 to wait for the outcome of a meeting between OPEC and its allies regarding possible output cuts, a senior Saudi source familiar with the matter said on Sunday.
"It is an unprecedented measure that has not been taken by Aramco before. May OSPs will depend on how the OPEC+ meeting concludes. We are doing what we can to make it successful, including taking this extraordinary step to delay the OSPs," the Saudi source said.
Saudi Aramco typically issues its OSPs by the 5th of each month, setting the trend for Iranian, Kuwaiti and Iraqi prices and affecting more than 12 million barrels of oil per day bound for Asia.
OPEC and allies are due to meet on Thursday to discuss a possible new global crude supply cut to end a price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia which has prompted US President Donald Trump to intervene.
The Saudi source said that Riyadh wants to avoid a repeat of the outcome of a March meeting where oil talks collapsed between OPEC and allies "due to Russia's lack of cooperation with the rest of OPEC+ participants".
Coordinated cuts between OPEC members and others led by Russia expired on March 31 having helped support crude prices since they began in January 2017.
The OPEC+ meeting was initially due for Monday, but was postponed to April 9 "to allow for more time to reach out to all producers including OPEC+ and others," the Saudi source said.