Storm Ciara helps British Airways to quickest ever subsonic flight between New York and London

Storm Ciara helps British Airways to quickest ever subsonic flight between New York and London
Flight BA112 reached a top speed of almost 1,300 kph. (Flightradar24)
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Updated 09 February 2020

Storm Ciara helps British Airways to quickest ever subsonic flight between New York and London

Storm Ciara helps British Airways to quickest ever subsonic flight between New York and London
  • Tail winds of 300kph mean flights cut more than an hour from the usual flight time
  • Flight BA112 reached a top speed of almost 1,300 kph and was one minute faster than a Virgin Airbus A350 flight which landed shortly after

LONDON: While travel in UK and Europe is being severely disrupted by a large storm, for some passengers the weather system brought a welcome bonus.

A British Airways flight from New York to London on Sunday became the fastest subsonic flight between the two cities thanks to an almighty tail wind.

Flight tracking website Flightradar24 said the Boeing 747 made the journey in four hours 56 minutes - more than an hour quicker than the average flight time for the route.

Flight BA112 reached a top speed of almost 1,300 kph and was one minute faster than a Virgin Airbus A350 flight which landed shortly after. Another Virgin flight that landed half an hour later was just three minutes slower than the BA flight.

All three flights smashed the previous record held by Norwegian since 2018 of  five hours and 13 minutes, according to Flightradar24.

 

 

The jets were able to make use of the 300 kph tale winds brought with storm Ciara. Flights in the opposite direction however, were taking more than two hours longer.

British Airways said it always prioritised safety over speed records, “but our highly trained pilots made the most of the conditions to get customers back to London well ahead of time.”

Storm Ciara, which battered the UK and northern Europe with hurricane force winds on Sunday, led to scores of grounded flights and others being diverted.


TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps

TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps
Updated 18 January 2021

TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps

TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps
  • Facebook-owned WhatsApp badly hit by a backlash after updating its privacy policy

DUBAI: Signal is more comfortable instant messaging service to use compared with other apps such as WhatsApp or Telegram, according to half of those who responded to an Arab News poll.

Signal’s surge in popularity among smartphone users, thanks to a two-word tweet from technology entrepreneur Elon Musk endorsing the encrypted messaging service, clearly showed as 50 percent of the 1,451 respondents expressed contentment with it.

Facebook-owned WhatsApp, badly hit by a backlash after updating its privacy policy, got a thumbs-up from three out of 10 poll respondents while Telegram had about a tenth of supporters. The remaining 10 percent of Arab New readers who responded to the poll meanwhile said none of the three instant messaging apps were comfortable to use.

 

 

Musk earlier urged users to “Use Signal” after WhatsApp, the most popular instant messaging app, was accused of forcing subscribers to share their personal data with its parent company Facebook for advertising.

Users had to accept these new terms before February 8, otherwise their accounts will be deleted. The ensuing furor prompted WhatsApp to delay its take it or leave it privacy update until May.

It likewise came out with a clarification the privacy changes were focused on how businesses used the app.

“We want to be clear that the policy update does not affect the privacy of your messages with friends or family in any way,” WhatsApp said in a statement.

“Instead, this update includes changes related to messaging a business on WhatsApp, which is optional, and provides further transparency about how we collect and use data.”