Dubai suspends issuance of permits for business events until March 31

Majid Al Futtaim, while operates shopping centers including Mall of the Emirates, reduced operating hours as a precaution against the spread of coronavirus. (AFP)
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Updated 18 March 2020

Dubai suspends issuance of permits for business events until March 31

DUBAI: Dubai’s Department of Economic Development (DED) has suspended the issuance of all permits for business events, covering conferences, exhibitions and meetings, across the emirate until March 31 as a precaution against the spread of coronavirus.

In a circular, the Dubai DED said that: “In line with ongoing efforts to safeguard public health, the Department of Economic Development in Dubai temporarily pauses the issuance of all business events’ permits, including conferences, exhibitions and meetings, until the end of March 2020.”

 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

. في إطار التدابير الاحترازية الرامية لتحقيق أعلى مستويات الصحة والسلامة للمجتمع، توقف اقتصادية دبي ، إصدار جميع التصاريح لفعاليات الأعمال (المؤتمرات، المعارض، الاجتماعات) في الإمارة بشكل مؤقت حتى نهاية شهر مارس 2020. In line with ongoing efforts to safeguard public health, Dubai Economy temporarily pauses the issuance of all business events’ permits (conferences, exhibitions, meetings) till the end of March 2020. @ded_brl #الإمارات #دبي #اقتصادية_دبي ‏#UAE #Dubai #DubaiEconomy #DubaiDED #DED ‏#DepartmentOfEconomicDevelopment #Economy

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UAE health authorities on late Tuesday reported 15 new cases of coronavirus, bringing to 113 the total infection tally in the UAE.

Mall operator Majid Al Futtaim late Tuesday announced an adjustment in the timings of all Dubai shopping malls they operate, including Mall of the Emirates, City Centre Mirdif, City Centre Deira and City Centre Al Shindagha.

“Our doors will open from 12:00p.m. till 8:00p.m. starting March 18th, 2020 – excluding Carrefour UAE and pharmacies which will remain open as per their original schedule. Your safety is our concern,” Majid Al Futtaim posted at Mall of the Emirates’ Facebook page.


BT warns UK that banning Huawei too fast could cause outages

Updated 13 July 2020

BT warns UK that banning Huawei too fast could cause outages

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson is due to decide this week whether to impose tougher restrictions on Huawei
  • British PM in January granted Huawei a limited role in the 5G network

LONDON: BT CEO Philip Jansen urged the British government on Monday not to move too fast to ban China’s Huawei from the 5G network, cautioning that there could be outages and even security issues if it did.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson is due to decide this week whether to impose tougher restrictions on Huawei, after intense pressure from the United States to ban the Chinese telecoms behemoth from Western 5G networks.
Johnson in January defied President Donald Trump and granted Huawei a limited role in the 5G network, but the perception that China did not tell the whole truth over the coronavirus crisis and a row over Hong Kong has changed the mood in London.
“If you are to try not to have Huawei at all, ideally we would want seven years and we could probably do it in five,” Jansen told BBC radio.
Asked what the risks would be if telecoms operators were told to do it in less than five years, Jansen said: “We need to make sure that any change of direction does not lead to more risk in the short term.”
“If we get to a situation where things need to go very, very fast, then you are into a situation where potentially service for 24 million BT Group mobile customers is put into question — outages,” he said.
In what some have compared to the Cold War antagonism with the Soviet Union, the United States is worried that 5G dominance is a milestone toward Chinese technological supremacy that could define the geopolitics of the 21st century.
The United States says Huawei is an agent of the Chinese Communist State and cannot be trusted.
Huawei, the world’s biggest producer of telecoms equipment, has said the United States wants to frustrate its growth because no US company could offer the same range of technology at a competitive price.