Palestinian dies after being wounded in West Bank clashes: ministry

A man holds a Palestinian flag on his home rooftops to mark Land Day as mass rallies planned to commemorate the event were cancelled amid concerns about the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), near Hebron in the Israeli-occupied West Bank March 30, 2020. (Reuters)
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Updated 01 April 2020

Palestinian dies after being wounded in West Bank clashes: ministry

  • Official news agency Wafa quoted a local mayor as saying he was shot by a rubber-coated bullet

NABLUS: A Palestinian died on Wednesday three weeks after being wounded during clashes with Israeli troops near the city of Nablus in the occupied West Bank, the Palestinian health ministry said.
Islam Dweikat, 22, was shot on March 11 on the outskirts of the city in the north of the territory, according to the ministry. He died in a hospital in the central city of Ramallah.
Official news agency Wafa quoted a local mayor as saying he was shot by a rubber-coated bullet.
On the day of the clashes, 15-year-old Mohammed Hamayel was killed when he was shot in the face by Israeli live fire, the ministry said at the time.
An Israeli army statement from March 11 said soldiers had faced a “violent riot” of roughly 500 Palestinians hurling rocks and setting tires on fire.
An AFP journalist in Nablus said hundreds of Palestinians had gathered in an area south of the city in response to rumors that Israeli settlers were coming to seize land.
The army had denied using live ammunition to break up the demonstration, but said it was investigating Hamayel’s death and other reported injuries.
An army spokeswoman confirmed to AFP on Wednesday that an investigation had been opened, but said it would take time to reach a conclusion.

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Tunisians emerge from lockdown into mosques and cafes

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Tunisians emerge from lockdown into mosques and cafes

TUNIS: Tunisians returned to mosques and cafes on Thursday as the country ended most lockdown restrictions after largely containing the spread of the novel coronavirus for now.
Sitting with friends at the Brazil coffeeshop in the Ibn Khaldoun district of Tunis, schoolteacher Nizar Jamal said he was glad to resume his daily chats with friends.
“We are again breathing the air of life. We missed the smell of coffee a lot,” he said.
Tunisia in March closed its international borders, stopped all movement between towns and cities, shuttered mosques, shops, schools, cafes and restaurants, imposed a nightly curfew and stopped people leaving homes at day for most reasons.
It has recorded 1,048 cases of the coronavirus and 48 deaths, compared with nearly 10,000 cases in neighboring Algeria. The only recent cases came from people arriving into quarantine from abroad.
Schools will stay closed to most students until the start of the new academic year in September and the government still restricts social gatherings at homes and urges the wearing of masks. International borders will reopen fully in late June.
In another Tunis district, Menzah 9, a cafe owner who gave only his first name, Mahmoud, said he was relieved to have reopened.
“This cafe provides work for 20 families. We have suffered a lot from stopping work for three months and we hope to make up for it soon,” he said.
Tunisia’s government has announced compensation measures to help businesses and needy families with the economic effects of the lockdown and has agreed a package of financial assistance from the International Monetary Fund.