Omani fashion label donates face masks in COVID-19 fight

The Omani label will be donating face masks to those that need them most. Instagram
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Updated 07 April 2020

Omani fashion label donates face masks in COVID-19 fight

DUBAI: Omani womenswear label Amal Al-Raisi is the latest fashion house to join the fight against COVID-19. The fashion designer behind the eponymous brand has announced that she will be using deadstock fabric to manufacture and distribute reusable face masks. She will be producing approximately 200 masks per week and giving these out free of charge with online orders and distributing them to organizations in Oman that help those in need.

Major fashion and beauty brands have stepped up to help curb the spread of the infectious disease. 

The LVMH factory has started making hand sanitizer; Burberry is funding research for a single-dose vaccine currently underway at the University of Oxford and US-based hijab company Haute Hijab is providing headscarves to the female healthcare workers fighting COVID-19.


This fashion designer is making hijabs for Covid-19 frontline workers

Updated 31 May 2020

This fashion designer is making hijabs for Covid-19 frontline workers

DUBAI: Hijab-wearing healthcare workers on the frontlines of the coronavirus pandemic  have taken to washing their headscarves more frequently and after every use to maintain sanitation. Some women are even disposing of their hijabs after in between every shift to help mitigate the spread of germs, and are thus facing a shortage.

This is why Minnesota fashion designer Hilal Ibrahim has set out to design a sanitary head scarf that can be easily washed and safely reused. The owner of Henna & Hijabs, a boutique specializing in organic henna and hijabs, has already donated over 700 hijabs to doctors and nurses on the frontline of the coronavirus crisis all across the state. 

The hospital-grade head scarves, which come in a variety of hues, including black, tan, blue and blush pink, were designed in a way that they don’t impact mobility on the job while adhering to religious needs. Handcrafted out of jersey material, the pieces are breathable and efficient for the fast-paced work environment. They're also designed to withstand industrial washing machines. 

It’s not the first time the Minnesota-native teamed up with hospitals to provide hijabs for Muslim wearing healthcare workers. In 2019, Ibrahim joined forces with Park Nicollet and HealthPartners to design healthcare appropriate hijabs for patients and healthcare professionals. Her hijabs are also sold in the Methodist gift shop where Ibrahim first volunteered at age 14.