Business as usual in Iran as malls, bazaars reopen amid pandemic coronavirus

Business as usual in Iran as malls, bazaars reopen amid pandemic coronavirus
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Iran on Monday began opening intercity highways and major shopping centers to stimulate its sanctions-choked economy. (AP)
Business as usual in Iran as malls, bazaars reopen amid pandemic coronavirus
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Cars pack a street in the Iranian capital Tehran, on April 18, 2020, after authorities eased lockdown measures due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (AFP)
Business as usual in Iran as malls, bazaars reopen amid pandemic coronavirus
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Iranians shop at the Grand Bazaar market in the capital Tehran on April 20, 2020, as the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic lingers ahead of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. (AFP)
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Updated 21 April 2020

Business as usual in Iran as malls, bazaars reopen amid pandemic coronavirus

Business as usual in Iran as malls, bazaars reopen amid pandemic coronavirus
  • There are still lingering questions over Iran’s outbreak and the safety of those returning to work
  • Mosques and shrines remain closed after earlier being suspected of being a transmission source for the virus

DUBAI: Shopping malls and bazaars reopened in Iran on Monday despite warnings by some health officials that a new wave of coronavirus infections could ripple through the country hardest hit by the pandemic.
Iran has struggled to curb the spread of COVID-19 but authorities also worry that measures to limit public life to rein in the virus could finish off an already sanctions-battered economy.
Seeking a balance between protecting public health and shielding the economy, the government has refrained from wholesale lockdowns of cities like those imposed in many other countries, but has extended closures of schools and universities and banned cultural, religious and sports gatherings.
Effective on Monday, President Hassan Rouhani’s government lifted a ban on intercity travel and ended a closure of businesses judged to pose only a “medium risk” of spreading the coronavirus, across the country.
“Medium-risk businesses like shops in ... bazaars or beside each other in buildings like shopping centers will be allowed to reopen while respecting health protocols,” Rouhani said on Sunday in a televised meeting of his coronavirus task force.
With that ban lifted, state television showed heavy commuter traffic resuming in the capital Tehran and other cities.

FASTFACTS

• Tehran has struggled to curb the spread of COVID-19 but authorities also worry that measures to limit public life to rein in the virus could finish off an already sanctions-battered economy.

• With that ban lifted, state television showed heavy commuter traffic resuming in the capital Tehran and other cities.

• The return to bustling urban activity drew concern and criticism from some health experts, the head of Tehran’s coronavirus task force and the chairman of its city council.

The return to bustling urban activity drew concern and criticism from some health experts, the head of Tehran’s coronavirus task force and the chairman of its city council.
“I am seriously concerned about what is happening ... My fear is that people will not take the outbreak seriously,” a doctor at Tehran’s Rasulollah Hospital told state TV.
“Everything depends on the degree to which people are respecting the health protocols. People should not think that the situation has become normal again,” Mohammad Asayi, an adviser to the health minister, told state TV. “Stay at home!” he said.
The protocols call for Iranians to maintain social distancing, wear masks in public and wash their hands regularly, but are advisory only with no penalties for infractions.
Health inspectors will visit reopened shops at random to help ensure compliance with those measures, government officials told state media.
Rouhani said on Sunday “high-risk” businesses, including theaters, gyms, saunas and beauty salons, would remain closed “until further notice.” Mosques and shrines, he added, will stay shut at least until May 4, some 10 days into the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.
But Alireza Zali, head of the government-run coronavirus task force in Tehran, cautioned that reopening businesses risked wider transmissions of the virus, Iranian media reported.
“The most important point is that more commuting, especially through public transportation, adds to the possibility of the spread of the virus,” Zali told state TV.
Nasrin Hosseinzadeh, a retired Tehran teacher, told Reuters by telephone that the city on Monday was busy again “like those days before the coronavirus outbreak. No one seems to care anymore.”
Mohsem Hashemi, head of the Tehran city council, also warned of a resurgence of the disease “if the restrictions are relaxed too early,” Iranian media reported.
The Health Ministry said on Monday the country’s death toll from COVID-19 had reached 5,209 among a total of 83,505 infected people. The 24-hour tally of new deaths, however, has been falling over the past days.