This young Moroccan designer is producing face masks for those in need

Portrait of Karim Adduchi. (Supplied)
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Updated 13 May 2020

This young Moroccan designer is producing face masks for those in need

DUBAI: Moroccan designer Karim Adduchi is known for his intricate designs that are infused with his Berber heritage and has made custom designs for models like Anna de Rijk and Rawdah Mohamed. But lately, his collections have taken a backseat to a new mission. For the past two months, the designer, who is based in Amsterdam, has been using his workshop to produce free face masks for local distribution, a protective measure against the novel coronavirus. 

“In the past two months we've been making and donating face masks for organizations supporting the homeless and families in need,” wrote Adduchi on his Instagram account.

To further aid in curbing the spread of the infectious disease, the designer uploaded the pattern for the protective equipment on his website so that anyone who wants to make their own reusable mask at home can do so. 



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In the past two months we've been making and donating face masks for organisations supporting the homeless and families need. We're offering the pattern for people who want to make their own washable mask, using fabric at home. Use a cotton fabric with a tight weave, which you can wash at min 65 degrees. Research shows that kitchen towels and sheets are excellent materials. Print the pattern at 100% size for an adult, and on 70% size for a child. The mask is double folded, so you can slide in a replaceable filter, such as kitchen paper, a piece of a vacuum cleaner bag, or microfiber fabric. If you have a question, email [email protected] @theworldmakersfoundation #weallcanhelp #karimadduchi #worldmakers

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“Print the pattern at 100% size for an adult, and on 70% size for a child. The mask is double folded, so you can slide in a replaceable filter, such as kitchen paper, a piece of a vacuum cleaner bag or microfiber fabric,” he explained. 

Since the coronavirus was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March, many regional designers have decided to switch gears and start using their production facilities and factories to produce personal protective equipment such as face masks and hospital gowns for those who need it most, including healthcare workers on the front line of the pandemic. 

Dubai-based fashion designer Marmar Halim is using the fashion label’s factory to produce surgical masks for medical personnel. Meanwhile, Beirut-based designers Bokja– which is known for making upholstered furniture with vintage fabric– is now dedicating their time to sewing silk face masks to curb the spread of the disease. 

And designers aren’t the only ones who have joined the cause. Tunisian-French model and singer Sonia Ben Ammar made 100 face masks to distribute to the elderly, who are among the most vulnerable to the infectious disease, residing at retirement homes.


Bollywood megastar Bachchan hospitalized with COVID-19

Updated 11 July 2020

Bollywood megastar Bachchan hospitalized with COVID-19

  • Affectionately known as "Big B", Bachchan shot to stardom in the early 1970s on the back of roles in huge hit movies such as "Zanjeer" and "Sholay"
  • Millions of Indians revere Bachchan like royalty, hanging on his every word and seeking his blessings

MUMBAI: Bollywood veteran megastar Amitabh Bachchan, 77, has tested positive for COVID-19 and been admitted to hospital in his hometown of Mumbai, he said Saturday on Twitter, calling for those close to him to get tested.
"I have tested CoviD positive .. shifted to Hospital," Bachchan wrote, saying his family and staff had already been tested and were awaiting their results.
"All that have been in close proximity to me in the last 10 days are requested to please get themselves tested!" he added.

His son Abhishek Bachchan, 44, said in a tweet minutes later that he had also tested positive.

The Bollywood actors were admitted to Nanavati Hospital in Mumbai, India's financial and entertainment hub, and several other members of the high-profile family were tested for the virus.

Affectionately known as "Big B", Bachchan shot to stardom in the early 1970s on the back of roles in huge hit movies such as "Zanjeer" and "Sholay".
His films still open to packed cinemas across India, but his new movie - comedy-drama "Gulabo Sitabo" - was released on Amazon's streaming service due to the coronavirus restrictions.
Bollywood recently resumed film shoots after a months-long hiatus following the imposition of a nationwide lockdown in India in late March.
But actors over the age of 65, such as Bachchan, are banned from set due to their vulnerability to the virus.
India's nationwide coronavirus toll rose Saturday to 820,916 cases - the third highest in the world - with 22,123 deaths.
Health workers have complained about severe staff shortages, with some senior doctors and nurses avoiding frontlines because of their risk of catching the virus.
As the death toll climbs, critics say the country is not testing enough - leaving many infections undiagnosed.
Millions of Indians revere Bachchan like royalty, hanging on his every word, seeking his blessings and congregating outside his Mumbai bungalow every year on October 11, his birthday.
The doyen of Bollywood is a keen user of Twitter, where he has 43 million followers, and his career has branched into television presenting, business and politics, as well as countless commercial endorsements.
Early in his acting life, Bachchan earned his reputation as India's "angry young man" for portraying violent heroes fighting an unjust system and injecting a new aggressive element into Bollywood movies, which had previously consisted of polite romances.
After some lean years, Bachchan bounced back spectacularly, largely due to his stint as host for the Indian version of the popular TV game show "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?", which revived his artistic and financial fortunes.
According to local media, he was being treated at Mumbai's Nanavati hospital.