Gunmen kill 15 villagers in northern Nigeria

Competition for land has pushed farmers and herders into conflict in Nigeria’s Kaduna state. (Reuters)
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Updated 13 May 2020

Gunmen kill 15 villagers in northern Nigeria

  • The assailants stormed the village of Gonar Rogo in Kaduna state early Tuesday as residents were asleep
  • President Muhammadu Buhari condemned the wave of attacks and counterattacks on people among the Fulani and Addara communities

KANO, Nigeria: Gunmen have attacked a mainly-Christian farming village in northern Nigeria, killing 15 people, police said, in the latest violence between farmers and herders in the area.
The assailants stormed the village of Gonar Rogo in Kaduna state early Tuesday as residents were asleep.
“The attackers started shooting sporadically, attacking villagers and in the process killed 15 people and injured five others,” state police spokesman Mohammed Jalige said in a statement late Tuesday.
He said the police launched an “intensive manhunt” in an operation that also sought to prevent “reprisal attacks.”
The village lies in Kajuru district in the southern part of Kaduna, a flashpoint of violence between farmers and Muslim Fulani herders.
Their long-running conflict is rooted in disputes over grazing and water rights.
President Muhammadu Buhari “condemned the wave of attacks and counterattacks on people among the Fulani and Addara communities,” his office wrote on Twitter.
“No person has the right to take the law into his or her own hands,” he insisted.


US judge delays extradition of Carlos Ghosn's accused escape plotters to Japan

Updated 29 October 2020

US judge delays extradition of Carlos Ghosn's accused escape plotters to Japan

  • Prosecutors say the Taylors facilitated a "brazen" escape in which Ghosn fled Japan on Dec. 29, 2019
  • Ghosn was awaiting trial on charges that he engaged in financial wrongdoing

BOSTON: A federal judge on Thursday granted a last-minute request to stop the US government from turning over to Japan two Massachusetts men to face charges that they helped smuggle former Nissan Motor Co Chairman Carlos Ghosn out of the country while he was awaiting trial on financial crimes.
US District Judge Indira Talwani in Boston granted a request by lawyers for US Army Special Forces veteran Michael Taylor and his son, Peter Taylor, to delay the transfer shortly before the two men were scheduled to be placed on a flight to Japan.
Their lawyers sought the delay after the State Department approved handing over the men, who in September lost a court challenge to their potential extradition. They were arrested in May at the request of Japanese authorities.
Taylors' lawyers and the State Department did not respond to requests for comment.
Prosecutors say the Taylors facilitated a "brazen" escape in which Ghosn fled Japan on Dec. 29, 2019, hidden in a box and on a private jet before reaching Lebanon, his childhood home, which has no extradition treaty with Japan.
Ghosn was awaiting trial on charges that he engaged in financial wrongdoing, including by understating his compensation in Nissan's financial statements. Ghosn denies wrongdoing.
The State Department notified the Taylors' lawyers of its decision on Wednesday.
US Senator Roger Wicker of Mississippi, a Republican who has taken interest in the case, wrote on Twitter that he was "outraged" by the State Department's decision to extradite the two men. "This former Special Forces member and his son will not be treated fairly," he said.