UN prosecutor hails arrest of Rwanda genocide suspect

Readers look at a newspaper June 12, 2002 in Nairobi carrying a ‘wanted’ photograph of Rwandan Felicien Kabuga. (Reuters)
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Updated 16 May 2020

UN prosecutor hails arrest of Rwanda genocide suspect

  • ‘Today’s arrest underlines the strength of our determination’
  • Felicien Kabuga was indicted by the UN International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in 1997 on seven counts including genocide

THE HAGUE: A top UN prosecutor said on Saturday that the arrest of a key Rwanda genocide fugitive in France showed that suspects would be brought to justice for crimes in the 1994 bloodshed.
“The arrest of Felicien Kabuga today is a reminder that those responsible for genocide can be brought to account, even 26 years after their crimes,” said Serge Brammertz, chief prosecutor of the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT) in The Hague.
“Today’s arrest underlines the strength of our determination.”
The prosecutor praised French authorities, saying the arrest “could not have been made without their exceptional cooperation and skill,” and also thanked other countries and international organizations that helped.
Kabuga is now expected to be transferred to the custody of The Hague to stand trial “following completion of appropriate procedures under French law,” the statement said.
Kabuga was indicted by the UN International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in 1997 on seven counts including genocide.
The Rwanda tribunal formally closed in 2015 and its duties have since been taken over by the MICT, which also deals with cases left over from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.


Indonesia’s Mt. Sinabung blasts tower of smoke and ash into sky

Updated 21 min 16 sec ago

Indonesia’s Mt. Sinabung blasts tower of smoke and ash into sky

  • Volcano on Sumatra island has been rumbling since 2010 and saw a deadly eruption in 2016
  • Indonesia is home to about 130 active volcanoes due to its position on the ‘Ring of Fire’

MEDA, Indonesia: Indonesia’s Mount Sinabung erupted Monday, belching a massive column of ash and smoke 5,000 meters into the air and coating local communities in debris.
The volcano on Sumatra island has been rumbling since 2010 and saw a deadly eruption in 2016.
Activity had picked up in recent days, including a pair of smaller eruptions at the weekend.
There were no reports of injuries or deaths, but authorities warned of possible lava flows.
“People living nearby are advised to be on alert for the potential appearance of lava,” Indonesia’s Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation Center said in a statement.
The crater’s alert status remained at the second-highest level.
No one lives inside a previously announced no-go zone around the volcano, but small communities nearby were coated in a layer of thick ash from Monday’s eruption.
Sinabung roared back to life in 2010 for the first time in 400 years. After another period of inactivity it erupted once more in 2013, and has remained highly active since.
In 2016, seven people died in one of Sinabung’s eruptions, while a 2014 eruption killed 16.
In late 2018, a volcano in the strait between Java and Sumatra islands erupted, causing an underwater landslide that unleashed a tsunami which killed more than 400 people.
Indonesia is home to about 130 active volcanoes due to its position on the “Ring of Fire,” a belt of tectonic plate boundaries circling the Pacific Ocean where frequent seismic activity occurs.