Buyout firm Sycamore Partners in talks to buy troubled J.C. Penney

Debt-laden J.C. Penney is cutting jobs and closing some stores. (AFP)
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Updated 07 June 2020

Buyout firm Sycamore Partners in talks to buy troubled J.C. Penney

  • There is no certainty that the talks between Sycamore and J.C. Penney will result in a deal

NEW YORK: Private equity firm Sycamore Partners is in preliminary talks to acquire J.C. Penney Co. Inc. (JCP.N) out of bankruptcy should the US department store chain’s negotiations with its creditors fail, three people familiar with the matter said on Friday. 

J.C. Penney, which employs roughly 85,000 people, filed for bankruptcy protection in May after the coronavirus pandemic forced it to temporarily close its more than 800 stores across the US, compounding financial woes that stemmed from years of dwindling sales.

Sycamore is weighing acquiring J.C. Penney outright or making an investment in the troubled retailer, the sources said.

There is no certainty that the talks between Sycamore and J.C. Penney will result in a deal, which would require a bankruptcy judge’s approval, the sources said.

J.C. Penney is also in touch with some of its landlords, including Brookfield Asset Management Inc. (BAMa.TO) and Simon Property Group (SPG.N), about possible transactions, the sources said. Under one scenario being explored, Sycamore, Brookfield and Simon would join forces on a bid for J.C. Penney, two of the sources said. Wells Fargo & Co. (WFC.N) is also involved in the discussions, one of the sources said.

J.C. Penney shares surged 47 percent after Reuters reported on the talks, ending the day up 55 percent to close at 32 cents. 

The sources requested anonymity because the discussions are confidential. Sycamore and J.C. Penney declined to comment. Brookfield had no immediate comment, while Simon and Wells Fargo did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

J.C. Penney is in discussions about handing over control to its lenders in exchange for reducing its nearly $5 billion debt. This hinges on a slew of investment firms that hold the company’s senior debt and have provided the company’s bankruptcy financing agreeing to J.C. Penney’s business plan by July 14.

If the Texas-based company does not persuade enough lenders to approve its plan by the following day, July 15, the terms of its bankruptcy loan require J.C. Penney to abandon its reorganization efforts and pursue a sale.

It is unclear how much Sycamore is willing to pay for J.C. Penney, which is in the process of closing stores and cutting jobs.

Sycamore, a New York private equity firm that specializes in retail and consumer investments, has in the past taken control of high-profile businesses such as office supplies chain Staples, women’s clothing retailer Talbots and department-store operator Belk.

Last month, Sycamore walked away from a $525 million deal to buy a majority stake in L Brands Inc’s (LB.N) Victoria’s Secret, as the pandemic hammered sales at the lingerie chain. 

Brookfield and Simon operate malls across the US. Brookfield in May said it would devote $5 billion to non-controlling investments designed to revitalize retailers struggling in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak.

During a court hearing on Thursday, US Bankruptcy Judge David Jones approved fresh financing from senior lenders to aid J.C. Penney’s operations.


Singapore Airlines drops ‘flights to nowhere’ after outcry

Updated 29 September 2020

Singapore Airlines drops ‘flights to nowhere’ after outcry

  • Several carriers have been offering short flights that start and end at the same airport to raise cash

SINGAPORE: Singapore Airlines said Tuesday it had scrapped plans for “flights to nowhere” aimed at boosting its coronavirus-hit finances after an outcry over the environmental impact.
With the aviation industry in deep crisis, several carriers – including in Australia, Japan and Taiwan – have been offering short flights that start and end at the same airport to raise cash.
They are designed for travel-starved people keen to fly at a time of virus-related restrictions, and have proved surprisingly popular.
But Singapore’s flag carrier – which has grounded nearly all its planes and cut thousands of jobs – said it had ditched the idea following a review.
The carrier has come up with alternative ideas to raise revenue, including offering customers tours of aircraft and offering them the chance to dine inside an Airbus A380, the world’s biggest commercial airliner.
Environmental activists had voiced opposition to Singapore Airlines launching “flights to nowhere,” with group SG Climate Rally saying they would encourage “carbon-intensive travel for no good reason.”
“We believe air travel has always caused environmental harm, and it is now an opportune moment for us to think seriously about transitions instead of yearning to return to a destructive status quo.”
The airline said earlier this month it was cutting about 4,300 jobs, or 20 percent of its workforce, the latest carrier to make massive layoffs.
The International Air Transport Association estimates that airlines operating in the Asia-Pacific region stand to lose a combined $27.8 billion this year.
The group also forecasts that global air traffic is unlikely to return to pre-coronavirus levels until at least 2024.