France’s Macron says Turkey playing ‘dangerous game’ in Libya

French President Emmanuel Macron during a joint news conference with Tunisian President Kais Saied (not pictured) after their meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, June 22, 2020. (Reuters)
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Updated 22 June 2020

France’s Macron says Turkey playing ‘dangerous game’ in Libya

  • Macron says Turkey was playing “a dangerous game” that went against everything it had agreed to

PARIS: French President Emmanuel Macron pointed the finger at Turkey on Monday over its support of the internationally recognized government in Libya, saying Turkey was playing “a dangerous game” that went against everything it had agreed to in international talks.
“I have already had the opportunity to say very clearly to President (Tayyip) Erdogan (that) I consider that Turkey is playing a dangerous game in Libya today and contravenes all of its commitments made at the Berlin conference,” Macron said, referring to a peace meeting earlier this year.
Macron said he had spoken earlier to US President Donald Trump on the crisis in Libya.


Spain’s former king leaving country amid financial scandal

Updated 03 August 2020

Spain’s former king leaving country amid financial scandal

  • The 82-year-old former king is credited with helping Spain peacefully restore democracy after the death of dictator Francisco Franco in 1975
  • Marred by scandals in the later years of his reign, Juan Carlos in 2014 abdicated in favor of his son Felipe VI

MADRID: Spain’s former monarch, King Juan Carlos I, says he is leaving Spain to live in another country amid a financial scandal.
The royal family’s website on Monday published a letter from Juan Carlos to his son, King Felipe VI, saying “I am informing you of my considered decision to move, during this period, out of Spain.”
Spain’s prime minister recently said he found the developments about Juan Carlos — including investigations in Spain and Switzerland — “disturbing.”
The 82-year-old former king is credited with helping Spain peacefully restore democracy after the death of dictator Francisco Franco in 1975.
But marred by scandals in the later years of his reign, Juan Carlos in 2014 abdicated in favor of his son Felipe VI, losing the inviolability protection Spain’s Constitution grants to the head of state.
The royal house has denied that Felipe had any knowledge of his father’s alleged financial irregularities.