DJ Khaled’s barber wears protective gear while giving him a haircut at home

DJ Khaled’s barber wears protective gear while giving him a haircut at home
The US-Palestinian producer is not taking any risks when it comes to the coronavirus. Instagram
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Updated 29 June 2020

DJ Khaled’s barber wears protective gear while giving him a haircut at home

DJ Khaled’s barber wears protective gear while giving him a haircut at home

DUBAI: US-Palestinian music producer DJ Khaled went viral last week for wearing a full hazmat suit to go to the dentist for a root canal, and it appears that the “Wild Thoughts” hitmaker is continuing to take extreme precautions in order to protect himself and others from the coronavirus. 

This week, the father-of-two posted a picture of himself getting an at-home haircut on Instagram. To ensure his safety, his barber was wearing a full protective suit, along with a face mask, shield and gloves. 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

New norm

A post shared by DJ KHALED (@djkhaled) on

“New norm,” the 44-year-old captioned the photograph of the makeshift barbershop.

The post comes shortly after the Grammy award winner was called out by social media users for his scruffy quarantine hair and beard.

The “I’m the One” producer promised fans and critics he will “figure it out soon” — even if that means his barber has to wear a “space suit” to ensure proper social distancing amid the crisis.

“THEY DONT WANT ME TO GET A HAIRCUT SMH! I will get haircut I will figure it out soon lol. Quarantine alert. I’m get my Barbour a space suit stay tuned! (sic)” the star wrote alongside a side-by-side comparison of his signature, clean-shaven beard and his current one. “I NEED MY BEARD OIL ! Lol ! (sic)”

Despite self-isolating at home, the Miami-based artist did his part to help the community by donating medical supplies  to frontline health workers, along with his wife, Nicole Tuck.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Play wit it if you wantI got kids I don’t play games First day out the crib in 3 and half months

A post shared by DJ KHALED (@djkhaled) on


Egypt announces ‘major discoveries’ at Saqqara archaeological site

Egypt announces ‘major discoveries’ at Saqqara archaeological site
Updated 17 January 2021

Egypt announces ‘major discoveries’ at Saqqara archaeological site

Egypt announces ‘major discoveries’ at Saqqara archaeological site
  • Egyptian archaeologist says discoveries will rewrite history of region

CAIRO: An Egyptian archaeological mission working in the Saqqara area near the pyramids of Giza in Egypt has discovered dozens of archeological finds, including a Pharaonic funerary temple.

The Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities announced that the discoveries —  made by the joint mission between the council and the Zahi Hawass Center of Egyptology — include wooden wells and coffins from the New Kingdom, dating back to 3000 B.C.

Mostafa Waziri, secretary-general of the council, said that the discoveries are located at the Saqqara necropolis, near the pyramid where King Teti, the first king of the Sixth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom, who ruled Egypt between 2323 and 2291 B.C., is buried.

Zahi Hawass, Egyptian archaeologist and head of the mission, said that these discoveries will rewrite the history of the region, especially during the 18th and 19th Dynasties of the New Kingdom, during which time King Teti was worshiped.

Hawass said that the mission found the funerary temple of Queen Nearit, wife of King Teti, part of which was uncovered in the years prior to the mission, as well as three mud-brick warehouses on the southeastern side, used to store offerings and tools that were involved in a revival of the queen’s creed.

The mission also discovered 52 wells, ranging in depths between 10 to 12 meters and containing more than 50 wooden coffins from the New Kingdom era. This is the first time that coffins dating back to 3000 B.C. have been found in the Saqqara area.

The surfaces of the coffins depict various scenes involving the gods who were worshipped during this period, in addition to texts from the Book of the Dead that help the deceased pass on to the other world.

Inside the wells, the mission found numerous artifacts, such as statues of the deity Ptah, as well as a four-meter-long papyrus, representing chapter 17 from the Book of the Dead, with the name of its owner recorded on it. The same name was found on four statues.

Other finds included a set of wooden masks; games for the deceased to play in the other world, one of which is similar to chess; and statues and a shrine of Anubis, the god of death.

The mission also discovered a bronze ax, indicating that its owner was one of the leaders of the army in the New Kingdom era, and paintings inscribed with scenes of the deceased and his wife and hieroglyphic writings.

A large amount of pottery dating back to the New Kingdom was found, including pottery establishing trade relations between Egypt and Crete, as well as Syria and Palestine.

Hawass explained that this discovery confirms that the Saqqara antiquities area was not used for burial during the Late Period only, but also in the New Kingdom.

The mission studied the mummy of a woman who was found to be suffering from a disease known as Mediterranean fever or swine fever, which comes from direct contact with an animal and leads to a liver abscess.

Hawass asserted that the archeological discovery is one of the most significant ones of this year and will make Saqqara an important tourist and cultural destination. It will rewrite the history of Saqqara in the era of the New Kingdom and will confirm the importance of the worship of King Teti during the 19th Dynasty.