Adidas says its shutting down in Lebanon due to economic crisis

A closed Adidas store is pictured during the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Hamburg, Germany March 28, 2020. (Reuters)
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Updated 07 July 2020

Adidas says its shutting down in Lebanon due to economic crisis

CAIRO: Adidas will close down its branches in Lebanon by the end of the year as the country’s economic crisis slips out of control.
The sportswear giant has joined many popular brands who began withdrawing from the Lebanese market due to the turbulent economic situation caused by a currency collapse.
Adidas said it would no longer operate its own stores in Lebanon and that it would also close its head office.
“This is due to the ongoing economic challenges in the country,” the statement said. “We would like to thank our employees for their many contributions and our partners for our productive collaboration.”

The crisis has prompted others such as Mike Sport, a sports equipment retailer in Lebanon, to shut down given the ongoing financial crisis.
French restaurant Couqley has also said it was closing its branches “until the exchange rate has stabilized.”

Lebanon is going through an unprecedented economic and financial crisis that has seen the local currency lose more than 80 percent of its value against the US dollar in recent months amid soaring prices and popular unrest.


Egyptian churches open doors to visitors

Egyptian army soldier stands guard in front of Saint Joseph's Roman Catholic Church in Cairo, Egypt December 31, 2017. (REUTERS)
Updated 28 min 2 sec ago

Egyptian churches open doors to visitors

  • The regulations for the gradual return of Friday prayers will only be announced after they are discussed by the Council of Ministers.

CAIRO: Coptic Orthodox churches in Egypt are accepting visitors after a four-month closure to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The decision to shut the churches came during a Standing Committee meeting with the Holy Synod headed by Pope Tawadros on March 21.
The reopening on Aug. 3 coincides with the birthday of the late Pope Shenouda III.
Churches in Cairo and Alexandria accepted worshippers for prayers, while those in cities where the outbreak was limited, such as Luxor, reopened in June. Churches have taken steps to ensure the safety of visitors and staff, including regular cleaning and monitoring of visitors’ health and adherence to guidelines.
When visitors enter churches, body temperatures are checked and there is a disinfection process. Shoes are cleaned with a piece of chlorine-soaked cloth and ethyl alcohol is used to wash hands. Each visitor must bring their own handkerchief. All worshippers must wear face masks and maintain safe distances from one another.
The Egyptian Ministry of Awqaf said the regulations for the gradual return of Friday prayers will only be announced after they are discussed by the Council of Ministers.
In a bid to stop the spread of misinformation surrounding the plans, the ministry said the only accurate source of official information is through its website.
The ministry denied rumors that precautionary measures would include cutting the length of Friday sermons to 10 minutes.
Abdullah Hassan, spokesman for the Ministry of Awqaf, said that no official announcement on the return of Friday prayers has been made.
Hassan added that there have been several meetings on the issue of Friday prayers. The findings will be presented to the coronavirus crisis management committee following the Eid Al-Adha holiday.
Hassan urged Egyptian media outlets to ensure the accuracy and truthfulness of news. He added that people should report individuals who makes false claims.