Kuwait’s draft expat quota law will have exemptions

The committee said surplus expats will not be asked to leave the country after the law becomes effective. (File/AFP)
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Updated 27 July 2020

Kuwait’s draft expat quota law will have exemptions

  • Under the draft law domestic workers, GCC nationals, government contract workers as well as diplomats and relatives of Kuwaitis will all be exempt from the expat quota system
  • The draft law has been referred to Kuwait’s human resources development committee for consideration

DUBAI: The Kuwaiti government has drafted a law that will allow some foreign nationals to continue working in the country as it works to redress the balance of employment between expats and its own citizens.
Under the draft law domestic workers, GCC nationals, government contract workers as well as diplomats and relatives of Kuwaitis will all be exempt from the expat quota system, a panel report said.
The law - which aims to help rebalance Kuwait’s population - bans employers from hiring other nationalities once their numbers exceed the agreed quotas, local daily Kuwait Times reported.
Employers that exceed expat recruitment quotas in non-exempt lines of work face a jail term of up to 10 years and a fine of not more than $326,819.
The new proposal states that Indian nationals must not exceed 15 percent of the population. Sri Lankans, Filipinos and Egyptians must not account for more than 10 per cent each, while Bangladeshis, Pakistanis, Nepalis and Vietnamese must not cross five percent each, it said.
Other nationalities cannot exceed three percent each, it added.
The draft law has been referred to Kuwait’s human resources development committee for consideration.
The committee said surplus expats will not be asked to leave the country after the law becomes effective. But recruitment from abroad will be stopped until the number of each industry meets the targets, it added.


Arab nations send food, medical supplies to disaster-hit Lebanon

Updated 44 min 13 sec ago

Arab nations send food, medical supplies to disaster-hit Lebanon

  • Saudi Arabia at the forefront of an international relief air bridge for Lebanon

DUBAI: Arab nations are rushing to provide humanitarian relief to disaster-hit Lebanon, delivering planeloads of food and medical supplies to aid those affected by the massive explosion that rocked Beirut on Tuesday.

The devastating blast, thought to be caused by a stockpile of ammonium nitrate unsafely stored in a port warehouse, left a trail of damage over much of the capital and killed more than 150 people and injured thousands of others.

A UAE transport plane carrying 40 metric tons of critical medicine and food items, as well as nutritional supplements for children, arrived in the Lebanese capital as part of the assistance being implemented by the Emirates Red Crescent.

“A comprehensive phased humanitarian plan has been put in place in response to the crisis, and during this stage the focus is laid on providing medical supplies in support of the Lebanese health facilities under the current tough circumstances to help them respond to the needs of the large number of victims,” Dr Mohammed Atiq Al-Falahi, the ERC Secretary General, said in a report from state news agency WAM.

Saudi Arabia is at the forefront of an international relief air bridge, with about 200 tons of medical and emergency supplies so far delivered by the three aircraft dispatched to Lebanon.

Egypt has dispatched a second military plane to Lebanon, loaded with large quantities of medical supplies and food.

Two aircraft from Kuwait laden with medical supplies and food have arrived at Beirut’s international airport as part of the ongoing aid efforts to help Lebanon.

“We have just received two Kuwaiti planes carrying emergency aid,” on instructions of the Kuwait leadership, embassy advisor Abdullah Al-Shaheen said, and added that support will continue “in this time of adversity.”