Media scion James Murdoch quits News Corp. board

James Murdoch said his resignation was due to ‘disagreements over certain editorial content published by the company’s news outlets and certain other strategic decisions.’ (AFP file photo)
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Updated 01 August 2020

Media scion James Murdoch quits News Corp. board

  • James Murdoch has been openly critical of some media coverage from publishing empire News Corp’s outlets in recent months

NEW YORK: Former 21st Century Fox chief executive James Murdoch, the son of media tycoon Rupert Murdoch, has resigned from News Corp’s board citing clashes over editorial content.
The 47-year-old once seen as his father’s successor has been openly critical of some media coverage from publishing empire News Corp’s outlets in recent months.
According to a letter written by James Murdoch and released Friday by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), his resignation was due to “disagreements over certain editorial content published by the company’s news outlets and certain other strategic decisions.”
News Corp. owns the Wall Street Journal, the New York Post, The Times and the Sun newspapers among others, but not Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News network.
Its media operations have been hit by an advertising slump aggravated by the coronavirus pandemic in Australia.
In May, News Corp. announced that it would stop printing more than 100 Australian regional and local newspapers, shifting to digital-only versions instead.
The group reported net profit of $23 million for the quarter from January to March, boosted by its HarperCollins book division.
James Murdoch’s decision hastens his disengagement from the family media empire, which grew from a newspaper group in Australia.
In January, he denounced the climate change skepticism of some Murdoch media, citing coverage of the fires which devastated large parts of Australia.
In a statement, widely reported by US media at the time, Murdoch and his wife spoke of their “frustration” with some of the News Corp. and Fox coverage, adding that they were “particularly disappointed with the ongoing denial among the news outlets in Australia given obvious evidence to the contrary.”
Rupert Murdoch has said he does not employ climate change deniers, and has previously described himself as a climate “skeptic.”
The pair have also diverged politically.
While Rupert Murdoch has been a longtime supporter of Republican President Donald Trump, his son has reportedly donated hundreds of thousands to Democrat challenger Joe Biden’s 2020 campaign.
James Murdoch, who headed 21st Century Fox until he stepped down last year when Disney acquired most of the group’s assets, has launched his own private holding company called Lupa Systems, which has taken a stake in Vice Media.
“We’re grateful to James for his many years of service to the company. We wish him the very best in his future endeavors,” said Rupert Murdoch, executive chairman of News Corp. and James’s brother Lachlan Murdoch in a statement.


Lebanese news agency boycotts politicians’ press conferences, including Hezbollah’s Nasrallah

Updated 07 August 2020

Lebanese news agency boycotts politicians’ press conferences, including Hezbollah’s Nasrallah

  • The Lebanese news agency LBCI has said it will no longer provide coverage of any politician’s press conference, including Hezbollah’s Secretary-General Hassan Nasrallah
  • “Let your accomplishments speak for you and don’t distract people with storytelling,” an LBCI presenter said

LONDON: The Lebanese news agency LBCI has said it will no longer provide coverage of any politician’s press conference, including Hezbollah’s Secretary-General Hassan Nasrallah, following Tuesday’s massive explosions.

“The Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation International decided that what comes after Aug. 4 is not like what came before,” a presenter announced on live television on Friday.

“Because after the earthquake is not the same as before, because your (Lebanese government) neglect and failure is one of the main reasons for what we have come to ... because after Aug. 4, we need actions and not words, achievements and not speeches.

“Let your accomplishments speak for you and don’t distract people with storytelling,” she said.

“Finally, we tell people: While you are waiting for the speeches of your leaders, there are mothers who are waiting for the return of their children from the rubble — the priority is for them, not for you.”

Many Lebanese welcomed LBCI’s announcement, with several taking to social media to praise the move — especially given that Nasrallah spoke at a press conference at 5:30 p.m. local time, his first address since the blasts.

“Not only Nasrallah, but all speeches, by all parties. They are nothing more than propaganda. They own their own propaganda bullhorns, so let them use those to address their sheep, rather than block the airwaves for the rest of us,” Raghda Azad, a policy adviser, told Arab News.

“Not that LBC is a model or anything, but all television outlets should stop unquestioning and uncritical reports of so-called leaders,” she added.

However, some doubt the move will not be followed by other stations.

“I think it would be great if they all do. But I think because many people care what he says, stations feel like they should oblige,” Aya Chamseddine, a Beirut-based researcher, told Arab News.

“Generally, people tend to — even if they loathe him — root themselves in front of TVs to watch and listen. His speeches are theatrics above all,” she said. “His narrative will be predictable. He will say they know more than anyone what it means to lose people. He’ll be insulting.”

A Lebanese media expert, who did not want to be named due to the sensitivity of the issue, disagrees with the move.

“CNN, even when it hates (US President) Trump, carries his speeches. Nasrallah is the biggest political player in the region; when he speaks people would want to listen because of his effect on politics and our daily lives,” he said.

“The issue is analyzing what he says later, and tearing it apart when it is false or stupid, like CNN does after every Trump speech or statement.”

The boycott comes three days after Beirut was rocked by two blasts when 2,700 tons of ammonium nitrate confiscated six years ago and left in a port storage hangar exploded.

The massive explosions left at least 140 people dead, over 5,000 injured and more than 300,000 homeless. Many say that government corruption and negligence are behind the explosion.