Abdullah bin Zayed receives coronavirus vaccine

Al-Nahyan tweeted an image of himself receiving the trial vaccine. (Twitter)
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Updated 17 October 2020

Abdullah bin Zayed receives coronavirus vaccine

  • Al-Nahyan tweeted an image of himself receiving the trial vaccine
  • Last month UAE issued emergency approval for the COVID-19 vaccine for frontline healthcare workers

DUBAI: The United Arab Emirates’ Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al-Nahyan has received the coronavirus vaccine.
Al-Nahyan tweeted an image of himself receiving the trial vaccine with a caption saying “corona vaccination is our way to return to normal life.”

Last month, UAE issued emergency approval for the COVID-19 vaccine for frontline healthcare workers.
“The vaccine will be available to our first line of defense heroes who are at the highest risk of contracting the virus,” the National Emergency Crisis and Disaster Management Authority said.
The vaccine is compatible with the country’s laws, the country’s Minister of Health and Prevention Abdul Rahman Al-Owais, who was also the first to receive a vaccine, said.
Its effective and has resulted in a “strong response” by generated antibodies in trial volunteers, the health minister said.
The UAE has reported 1,412 new coronavirus cases on Friday, increasing total of infected people since the start of the pandemic to 112,849.
The health ministry also confirmed three more fatalities and 1,618 recoveries, bringing tolls to 455 deaths and 104,943 recovered patients.


Iranian Parliament calls for block on nuclear inspections

Updated 30 November 2020

Iranian Parliament calls for block on nuclear inspections

  • MPs said the “best response” to Fakhrizadeh’s assassination would be to “revive Iran’s glorious nuclear industry”
  • Tehran allowed additional inspections as part of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA)

LONDON: Iran’s Parliament has called for international inspectors to be barred from accessing the country’s nuclear facilities, in response to the killing of top nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh.

In a statement issued on Sunday, MPs said the “best response” to Fakhrizadeh’s assassination would be to “revive Iran’s glorious nuclear industry” by halting the voluntary implementation of protocols that allow more intrusive inspections of the country’s nuclear facilities.

Behrouz Kamalvandi, spokesman for Iran’s atomic energy organization, told Iranian media on Saturday that the issue of inspectors’ access “must be decided on at high levels” of the country’s leadership.

The Supreme National Security Council, a body directly answerable to Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, usually handles decisions related to the country’s nuclear program.

Tehran allowed additional inspections as part of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), widely referred to as the Iran nuclear deal, which eased crippling economic sanctions on the country in exchange for heavy restrictions on the development of its nuclear industry.

The JCPOA has faced heavy scrutiny from the Trump administration, which has taken several steps to roll back the various concessions made to Iran as part of the deal.