Luxury living at Dubai’s five-star Palazzo Versace

The hotel is located at Jaddaf Waterfront. (Supplied)
Short Url
Updated 21 November 2020

Luxury living at Dubai’s five-star Palazzo Versace

  • The five-star hotel is just as opulent as you’d expect from the Italian fashion house

DUBAI: If you wanted a sneak peek into Donatella Versace’s mind, a stay at Dubai’s five-star Palazzo Versacein Al-Jaddaf Waterfront is the closest thing. It’s exactly what you’d expect from the luxurious Italian designer — opulent and borderline-ridiculous in its luxuriousness.

On entering the hotel, you are greeted by a massive, 3,000-kilogram crystal chandelier imported from the Czech Republic, flanked by a 1.5 million-piece mosaic of Medusa set into the Italian marble floors. The interior of the lobby is decorated with sofa chairs — upholstered in Versace silk — and plump cushions, evoking a wealthy woman’s posh (or, depending on your taste, gaudy) living room. The high ceilings top a corridor lined with framed sketches of supermodels sporting Donatella’s couture creations, limited-edition Versace urns (there’s only four in the world), and rich purple carpets handcrafted from New Zealand wool.

The Versace brand is omnipresent, as you’d expect; from the hand-painted friezes in the lobby to the delicate china used to serve your coffee as you wait to check in. If you’re looking for something even a little modest, the Palazzo Versace is not it.




On entering the hotel, you are greeted by a massive, 3,000-kilogram crystal chandelier imported from the Czech Republic. (Supplied)

Each suite features polished parquet flooring and Versace homeware — silk-printed sheets and drinking glasses with the Medusa insignia carved into the bottom. In fact, the mythological figure is peppered throughout the interior, whether overtly — on the towels — or subtly, such as the knobs on the drawers. 

I was lucky enough to stay in the Grand Suite, a luxurious 130-square-meter room with sweeping views of the Dubai Creek. I entered into a spacious living room that was separate from the bedroom — the latter an ultra-Instagrammable place that includes a plush king-sized, baroque-style bed dressed in salmon-pink and golden linen (yes, with Versace patterns).

As one of Dubai’s most luxurious hotels, it’s unsurprising it’s home to one of the most luxurious bathrooms, too (or the ‘powder room’ as it's coyly referred to on the touch-sensor light switches). Between the Versace-branded toiletries lining the marble tub and counters, mosaic murals on the walls and Carerra marble flooring, the suite is worth booking for the bathroom itself. 




Each suite features polished parquet flooring and Versace homeware. (Supplied)

After settling in, I decided to unwind at La Piscina swimming pool. But there were no sun loungers available. Fortunately, the hotel has two other pools to choose from, so I made my way to Capri Lagoon, which was definitely more chilled out than La Piscina. It’s a sprawling infinity pool in which you can float above another Medusa mosaic.

If, like me, swimming plays havoc with your hair, the hotel spa also has a hair salon, so you can get yourself a quick blow dry before heading to dinner.

The hotel has a wide selection of restaurants to suit all taste palettes. There’s international cuisine at Giardino; Persian restaurant Enigma — headed by Iranian-born Michelin-starred Mansour Memarian — and Italian venue Vanitas. I opted for the latter, a cozy yet luxurious space that is equally fit for an intimate dinner date or a feast with friends. 




The hotel has a wide selection of restaurants to suit all tastes. (Supplied)

I had the Bruschetta Burrata served with tomatoes, mashed avocados and basil handpicked from the hotel’s garden for starters and the Tagliata di Wagyu — Wagyu Striploin served with a side of black truffle mashed potatoes and sautéed mushrooms — for my main. Naturally, everything was served in Versace tableware. 

While the food was good, it was not especially memorable. The portions were a good size, however, as they left room for dessert: Tiramisu, which was undoubtedly the highlight of the meal. 

Having returned to my suite, I was slightly disappointed to see the ultra-luxe bedding had been swapped for a generic white duvet and pillowcases. However, housekeeping was kind enough to grant my silly request to change the bedding back. While a better night’s sleep wasn’t fully guaranteed by the upgrade, it did provide an extra level of comfort. 

All in all, guests can expect excellent service from the moment you enter the Palazzo Versace until you check out. With staff always available and happy to help, you can be sure you’ll want for nothing during your stay, except maybe an extension.


Saudi vegan bodybuilder slams diet myths

Nutrition is the most important part when it comes to bodybuilding, then comes type of exercise, and good rest. (AFP)
Updated 29 November 2020

Saudi vegan bodybuilder slams diet myths

  • Ali Al-Salam, who stopped consuming animal products in 2017, says certain steps must be completed to have an athletic body

JEDDAH: The vegan diet has risen in popularity in Saudi Arabia in recent years and has been a constant topic of debate among Saudis, attracting the interest of many, including athletes.

Ongoing debates about whether the vegan diet is sufficient for normal people, let alone bodybuilders, abound, but one Saudi is answering them physically.
Veganism is a lifestyle that excludes all animal products from diets, clothing or any other purposes.
Over the years, a number of studies have found that people who eat vegan or vegetarian diets have a lower risk of heart disease, but other studies have also placed them at a higher risk of stroke, possibly due to the lack of vitamin B12, an essential vitamin that reduces the risk of anemia and neurological diseases.
Speaking to Arab News, 33-year-old Saudi vegan bodybuilder, Ali Al-Salam, who first started his vegan diet three years ago when he was suffering from high blood pressure, highlighted that the consumption of animal products is a deep rooted idea among bodybuilders and athletes.
“We always hear that in order to build muscle, we must consume animal products. In some parts of the world, there are people who can only have a small amount of animal products yet they live their lives healthily and comfortably and are not suffering from malnutrition — on the contrary, they have a lower level of chronic illnesses.”

When I consumed meat and animal products, I suffered from high blood pressure; it was 190 over 110, and I wasn’t even 30 yet. Two weeks into the vegan diet, it went down to 150. The vegan diet did what couldn’t be done with medications for me.

Ali Al-Salam, Saudi vegan bodybuilder

He said it also opened his eyes to what goes on in the dairy and meat industry; he began researching in 2016 and decided to become vegan in 2017.
“I was just like every other athlete, I used to consume a high amounts of protein. I remember in the last days before turning vegan, I used to have 10 egg whites and a piece of steak for breakfast to fulfil my protein needs. This made me think, ‘is this the only way to consume protein?’ And from then on, I started researching and got introduced to the vegan diet at a larger scale,” he said.
“When I consumed meat and animal products, I suffered from high blood pressure; it was 190 over 110, and I wasn’t even 30 yet. Two weeks into the vegan diet, it went down to 150. The vegan diet did what couldn’t be done with medications for me.”
He explained that bodybuilding does not solely rely on protein, and that there are steps that must be completed in order to reach an athletic body. Nutrition is the most important part, then comes type of exercise, and good rest.
“When we talk about good nutrition, it does not just rely on protein. Yes, it is important, but the amount of calories in general is more important,” he said.
“Let’s say you needed 200 grams of protein, does that mean if you consumed 200 grams of it, you would gain muscle? No. You need all the basic nutrients to reach a certain amount of calories in general,” he added.
He highlighted that as soon as people register for gym memberships, they immediately look for supplements because they think they cannot reach the needed amount of protein.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Veganism is a lifestyle that excludes all animal products from diets, clothing or any other purposes.

• Over the years, a number of studies have found that people who eat vegan or vegetarian diets have a lower risk of heart disease.

• But other studies have also placed them at a higher risk of stroke, possibly due to the lack of vitamin B12, an essential vitamin that reduces the risk of anemia and neurological diseases.

• Vegan athletes have more endurance, strength and faster muscle recovery, because the vegan diet is rich in antioxidants.

• Animal products sometimes cause inflammation, that your body needs to recover from in the first place.

“I’m talking about non-vegans here too, where their protein intake is already high. Marketing plays a big role here. People link protein to animal products because our society grew up with this idea as well.
“Can a vegan build muscle? Yes, when they eat right, exercise correctly and rest well. The misconception about protein stems from amino acids. People think vegan food lacks amino acids, and only animal products are full of them and that is far from the truth,” he added.
When comparing vegan athletes to regular athletes, he said vegan athletes have more endurance, strength and faster muscle recovery, because the vegan diet is rich in antioxidants which helps greatly in recovery, and because “animal products sometimes cause inflammation, that your body needs to recover from in the first place.”