Luxury living at Dubai’s five-star Palazzo Versace

Luxury living at Dubai’s five-star Palazzo Versace
The hotel is located at Jaddaf Waterfront. (Supplied)
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Updated 21 November 2020

Luxury living at Dubai’s five-star Palazzo Versace

Luxury living at Dubai’s five-star Palazzo Versace
  • The five-star hotel is just as opulent as you’d expect from the Italian fashion house

DUBAI: If you wanted a sneak peek into Donatella Versace’s mind, a stay at Dubai’s five-star Palazzo Versacein Al-Jaddaf Waterfront is the closest thing. It’s exactly what you’d expect from the luxurious Italian designer — opulent and borderline-ridiculous in its luxuriousness.

On entering the hotel, you are greeted by a massive, 3,000-kilogram crystal chandelier imported from the Czech Republic, flanked by a 1.5 million-piece mosaic of Medusa set into the Italian marble floors. The interior of the lobby is decorated with sofa chairs — upholstered in Versace silk — and plump cushions, evoking a wealthy woman’s posh (or, depending on your taste, gaudy) living room. The high ceilings top a corridor lined with framed sketches of supermodels sporting Donatella’s couture creations, limited-edition Versace urns (there’s only four in the world), and rich purple carpets handcrafted from New Zealand wool.

The Versace brand is omnipresent, as you’d expect; from the hand-painted friezes in the lobby to the delicate china used to serve your coffee as you wait to check in. If you’re looking for something even a little modest, the Palazzo Versace is not it.




On entering the hotel, you are greeted by a massive, 3,000-kilogram crystal chandelier imported from the Czech Republic. (Supplied)

Each suite features polished parquet flooring and Versace homeware — silk-printed sheets and drinking glasses with the Medusa insignia carved into the bottom. In fact, the mythological figure is peppered throughout the interior, whether overtly — on the towels — or subtly, such as the knobs on the drawers. 

I was lucky enough to stay in the Grand Suite, a luxurious 130-square-meter room with sweeping views of the Dubai Creek. I entered into a spacious living room that was separate from the bedroom — the latter an ultra-Instagrammable place that includes a plush king-sized, baroque-style bed dressed in salmon-pink and golden linen (yes, with Versace patterns).

As one of Dubai’s most luxurious hotels, it’s unsurprising it’s home to one of the most luxurious bathrooms, too (or the ‘powder room’ as it's coyly referred to on the touch-sensor light switches). Between the Versace-branded toiletries lining the marble tub and counters, mosaic murals on the walls and Carerra marble flooring, the suite is worth booking for the bathroom itself. 




Each suite features polished parquet flooring and Versace homeware. (Supplied)

After settling in, I decided to unwind at La Piscina swimming pool. But there were no sun loungers available. Fortunately, the hotel has two other pools to choose from, so I made my way to Capri Lagoon, which was definitely more chilled out than La Piscina. It’s a sprawling infinity pool in which you can float above another Medusa mosaic.

If, like me, swimming plays havoc with your hair, the hotel spa also has a hair salon, so you can get yourself a quick blow dry before heading to dinner.

The hotel has a wide selection of restaurants to suit all taste palettes. There’s international cuisine at Giardino; Persian restaurant Enigma — headed by Iranian-born Michelin-starred Mansour Memarian — and Italian venue Vanitas. I opted for the latter, a cozy yet luxurious space that is equally fit for an intimate dinner date or a feast with friends. 




The hotel has a wide selection of restaurants to suit all tastes. (Supplied)

I had the Bruschetta Burrata served with tomatoes, mashed avocados and basil handpicked from the hotel’s garden for starters and the Tagliata di Wagyu — Wagyu Striploin served with a side of black truffle mashed potatoes and sautéed mushrooms — for my main. Naturally, everything was served in Versace tableware. 

While the food was good, it was not especially memorable. The portions were a good size, however, as they left room for dessert: Tiramisu, which was undoubtedly the highlight of the meal. 

Having returned to my suite, I was slightly disappointed to see the ultra-luxe bedding had been swapped for a generic white duvet and pillowcases. However, housekeeping was kind enough to grant my silly request to change the bedding back. While a better night’s sleep wasn’t fully guaranteed by the upgrade, it did provide an extra level of comfort. 

All in all, guests can expect excellent service from the moment you enter the Palazzo Versace until you check out. With staff always available and happy to help, you can be sure you’ll want for nothing during your stay, except maybe an extension.


Palestinian singer Rasha Nahas discusses her long-delayed debut album

Updated 04 December 2020

Palestinian singer Rasha Nahas discusses her long-delayed debut album

Palestinian singer Rasha Nahas discusses her long-delayed debut album

AMSTERDAM: In May 2019, life was looking good for Palestinian singer-songwriter Rasha Nahas. She had begun to establish herself in Berlin — having moved there from her hometown of Haifa in 2017; her debut album — wrapped in 2018 — was just weeks away from being released; and she had a prospective tour of the Middle East and Europe lined up. 

“I feel like a lot of exciting things are happening and hopefully the album will bring more,” she told me then. “I’m not in a hurry, but I’m going full-power with all of my will and passion.”

Fast-forward to today and that debut album is still just weeks away from release. Not long after we spoke last year, Nahas began to experience pain in her wrists and hands. It quickly became serious enough that she went to see a doctor who diagnosed her with repetitive strain injury. 

Her debut album (cover pictured) is just weeks away from release. Supplied

“It was really hardcore,” she says. “Both my hands and wrists had very, very bad inflammation. I couldn’t type emails or hold my phone or carry groceries and stuff. It was basically from overplaying. It had been a very busy time with shows and traveling, and a lot of stress. That was good, in some ways, because it meant things were happening for me, but the mental stress also wasn’t good for my body. I just had to stop everything, take a break and focus on getting better.”

Having psyched herself up for the release of her album, the necessary postponement — and cancellation of her tour plans — was something of a comedown. 

“Everything was a big frustration,” she says. “And I couldn’t really let that energy out in music, because I wasn’t able to (play).”

That last part, especially, was a huge blow to someone for whom music has been “a place of escape and expression and dealing with things and understanding myself” since her early teens and has become the thing from which she makes her living — an impressive feat for any artist, but particularly an independent musician from the Middle East. 

Nahas first picked up a guitar – which actually belonged to her sister – when she was a kid. Supplied

Nahas first picked up a guitar when she was a kid. It actually belonged to her sister, who “took a few lessons then stopped.” 

“I would tune it in very weird ways and strum it and sing out of tune,” she says. “Then I decided to study guitar. The only available option that my parents liked was classical music. So for nine years I did classical guitar and theory. I wanted to drop it (often), but I’m glad I didn’t.”

Music was popular in the Nahas household — from classic Arab artists including Fayrouz (“My mother’s a big fan”) to Western artists. Nahas chose to listen mostly to the latter. “We had a massive collection of CDs in the car and every Saturday we’d drive to the Galilee with the windows open and very fresh air and listen to John Lennon. That’s my main memory of music from my childhood,” she says. As a teenager she branched out into hard rock, pop, jazz and more. Oh, and Avril Lavigne (“That’s a bit embarrassing now,” she admits). 

Music was popular in the Nahas household — from classic Arab artists to Western artists. Supplied

She estimates she wrote her first original song around the age of 15. “It probably sounded like a normal indie-rock song, but I think the (lyrical) content was quite different,” she says. “It was about life as a Palestinian girl understanding her identity, and asking questions — about the political situation too. Looking at it now, I think, ‘Woah! That’s what I was dealing with at the age of 15?’”

It took a few years before she felt she was developing her own identity as an artist, though. She played her first gig as she finished high school, aged 18, by which time she had about an hour’s worth of original material. 

It makes sense that Nahas had classical training and listened to a wide variety of genres growing up — and that she composes music for the theater professionally. Her songs, and particularly her vocal delivery, have a definite theatrical vibe, and there are hints of several influences — pop, indie rock, jazz, rockabilly, surrealism, punk, spoken-word, and more. The result is something that seems entirely organic and entirely honest. It’s not necessarily easily accessible, but it’s certainly some of the most interesting work you’ll hear from a contemporary Middle Eastern artist, at least in the English language. 

A still from the “Desert” music video. Supplied

The two singles released from the album so far — “The Clown” and title track “Desert” — are good examples; both showcasing her distinctive style. The former was written a month after Nahas moved to Berlin, aged 21 (because “I just needed to be away, make music and take time to just be and understand things”). “It came from a few days of thoughts that were gathering and piling up — about being away from home, about artists getting on stage and getting labeled as Palestinian or as Israeli, about the political situation that never really leaves you.”

The latter, released in November, was written around the same time. “It’s a very personal song talking about searching and the things that are changing around us,” Nahas explains. “In the video (shot in Haifa), we played a lot with metaphors and images — we have kids with guns, we have a dancer crucified on an olive tree to symbolize the ties to the land. We have an old, abandoned building in Haifa contrasted with the big glass buildings to ask ourselves where our identity — as Palestinian 48ers — fits between tradition and modern colonialism.”

“The Clown” is the first single from her debut album. Supplied

The search for identity is a central theme of Nahas’ debut album, which will finally see the light of day on January 29. “It was very influenced by the relocation from Palestine to Germany,” she says. “So it deals with questions of identity and of what our responsibility to our identity is. I come from this place that has a certain political weight, traditionally. So how do I deal with that weight? How do I sing about it? Who am I in it?”

The end to the record’s long delay will doubtless come as a huge relief to Nahas, after what she describes as “one of the heaviest years for me.” Her almost-complete recovery from injury all but coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the year also included the death of a close friend — one of the dancers in the “Desert” video. 

The search for identity is a central theme of Nahas’ debut album, which will finally see the light of day on January 29. Supplied

“That challenged my relationship with the (record). He was part of the creation, in a way. And the release was postponed because of the injury and the pandemic. I wished it had been finished and that he could have seen it, because he really put everything into it. So it just added another layer to everything.”

That heavy year hasn’t been entirely without positives though, she stresses. “Even though it’s been very unsettling, with my injury and the pandemic, it did ground something in me. It forced me to look inward more, but also to look at what’s around me and appreciate it and grow from it.”

She played her first gig as she finished high school, aged 18, by which time she had about an hour’s worth of original material. Supplied

Given the years between the album’s completion and release, I wonder if Nahas still feels as connected to the work. Her answer is a definite yes. 

“It captures a period in my life that I needed to capture and I’m really happy I did that. The songs came from a very honest place. That’s the most important thing — I feel like that doesn’t get old,” she says. “ So, it doesn’t matter when it comes out, because it’s real and it’s truthful — and I’m sure that will be reflected in the interaction with the people who are going to listen to it.”