Music icon Cher meets Pakistan PM ahead of elephant’s move

Music icon Cher meets Pakistan PM ahead of elephant’s move
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Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan (R) meets with American pop icon Cher in Islamabad. (AFP)
Music icon Cher meets Pakistan PM ahead of elephant’s move
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An elephant named "Kaavan," who waiting to be transported to a sanctuary in Cambodia, walks at the Maragzar Zoo in Islamabad, Pakistan, Friday, Nov. 27, 2020. (AP)
Music icon Cher meets Pakistan PM ahead of elephant’s move
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A photographer takes a picture of Kaavan waiting to be transported to a sanctuary in Cambodia, at the Maragzar Zoo in Islamabad, Pakistan, Friday, Nov. 27, 2020. (AP)
Music icon Cher meets Pakistan PM ahead of elephant’s move
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Volunteers paint an image of Kaavan on a crate to be used to be transported Kaavan to a sanctuary in Cambodia, at the Maragzar Zoo in Islamabad, Pakistan, Friday, Nov. 27, 2020. (AP)
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Updated 27 November 2020

Music icon Cher meets Pakistan PM ahead of elephant’s move

Music icon Cher meets Pakistan PM ahead of elephant’s move
  • The famed singer has for years campaigned for Kaavan the elephant and is helping pay for his move
  • Cher tweeted that she thanked Khan “For Making It Possible For Me To Take Kaavan To Cambodia”

ISLAMABAD: American pop icon Cher met Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan on Friday ahead of the relocation of an elephant from Islamabad’s dilapidated zoo to a Cambodian sanctuary.
The famed singer, who has for years campaigned for Kaavan the elephant and is helping pay for his move, arrived in the Pakistan capital this week to see the animal before the flight to Cambodia on Sunday.
“Appreciating her efforts in retiring Kaavan to an elephant sanctuary, the prime minister thanked Cher for her campaign and role in this regard,” a statement from Khan’s office read.
Cher tweeted that she thanked Khan “For Making It Possible For Me To Take Kaavan To Cambodia.”
The plight of Kaavan — an overweight, 35-year-old bull elephant — has drawn international condemnation and highlighted the woeful state of Islamabad’s zoo, where conditions are so bad a judge in May ordered all the animals to be moved.
A team of vets and experts from Four Paws, an Austria-based animal welfare group, has spent months working with Kaavan to get him ready for the journey to Cambodia.
Experts have trained Kaavan to enter a large metal crate that will be used to transport the animal to the airport.
Volunteers working with Kaavan say he responds well to music and singing, and Cher is expected to belt out a song or two for the elephant before he departs Islamabad.

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