Frankly Speaking: Arab News premieres first talkshow with former PM of Pakistan

Frankly Speaking: Arab News premieres first talkshow with former PM of Pakistan
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Hosted by veteran journalist Frank Kane, program will interview movers and shakers, world policymakers. (Screenshot)
Frankly Speaking: Arab News premieres first talkshow with former PM of Pakistan
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Hosted by veteran journalist Frank Kane, program will interview movers and shakers, world policymakers. (Screenshot)
Frankly Speaking: Arab News premieres first talkshow with former PM of Pakistan
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The first episode of “Frankly Speaking” launches on Saturday at 5 p.m. Riyadh time (11 p.m. GMT) and will feature former Pakistani Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz. (Screenshot)
Frankly Speaking: Arab News premieres first talkshow with former PM of Pakistan
4 / 4
The first episode of “Frankly Speaking” launches on Saturday at 5 p.m. Riyadh time (11 p.m. GMT) and will feature former Pakistani Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz. (Screenshot)
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Updated 28 November 2020

Frankly Speaking: Arab News premieres first talkshow with former PM of Pakistan

Frankly Speaking: Arab News premieres first talkshow with former PM of Pakistan
  • Hosted by veteran journalist Frank Kane, program will interview movers and shakers, world policymakers
  • Each episode of the program is 20 minutes, with occasional additional reporting and interviews to be included throughout

LONDON: Arab News, the region’s leading English-language Middle East newspaper, is proud to announce its latest video product: “Frankly Speaking,” a recorded show that will interview and challenge movers and shakers, world policymakers and influential deciders on topics relating to the Arab world.

Hosted by veteran, award-winning journalist and senior Arab News business columnist, Frank Kane, who has interviewed influential business leaders and key politicians from around the world including Emirati tycoon, Khalaf Al-Habtoor, president of the World Economic Forum (WEF), Borge Brende, and Anthony Scaramucci, the former communications adviser to US President Donald Trump.

Each episode of the program is 20 minutes, with occasional additional reporting and interviews to be included throughout.

 

 

“Frankly Speaking” will be available on Arab New’s YouTube channel and on the program page on the Arab News website.

Commenting on the launch, Arab News Editor in Chief Faisal J. Abbas said: “As the leading English language news source on Saudi Arabia and Middle East, it was only natural for Arab News to expand its video offering and we are very proud to present 'Frankly Speaking' as our first product for our followers worldwide.”

“While editorial integrity can only be proven, the combination of the credibility of both the Arab News brand and the long experience and interview style of Frank Kane will ensure that each episode provides an intellectually stimulating debate and plenty of material for further discussion,” he said.

 

 

The first episode of “Frankly Speaking” launches on Saturday at 5 p.m. Riyadh time (2 p.m. GMT) and will feature former Pakistani Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz, who will talk about his own recipe for change in Pakistan, Saudi Arabia’s reforms, the difference between Islamabad’s relationship with Iran and with Saudi Arabia, as well as his views on Israel.


YouTube bans seven Houthi channels 

YouTube bans seven Houthi channels 
Updated 24 January 2021

YouTube bans seven Houthi channels 

YouTube bans seven Houthi channels 
  • It deleted accounts that the group had been using to share its agenda
  • The terrorist-designated organization used the channels and other social media platforms to stream propaganda and encourage violence

LONDON: YouTube permanently deleted seven Houthi accounts on Sunday due to a breach of its policy, less than a week after the US designated the militia as a foreign terrorist organization. 

It deleted accounts that the group had been using to share its agenda, such as its main channel “Ferqat Ansar Allah” and “Al Ealam Al-Harbe,” which translates as the war media.

The terrorist-designated organization used the channels and other social media platforms to stream propaganda and encourage violence.

Many leaders and members within the Houthi movement remain active on social media, such as the group’s current leader Muhammad Ali Al-Houthis, and continue to incite hate and violent speech.

The US designation came into effect last Tuesday, the day before President Donald Trump left office. The Houthis are accused of waging a deadly campaign that has destabilized Yemen and the Middle East.

“The designations are intended to hold Ansar Allah accountable for its terrorist acts, including cross-border attacks threatening civilian populations, infrastructure and commercial shipping,” US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said earlier this month, using the official name of the Houthi movement.

He added that the designations would not affect the work of relief agencies.